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Cumberbatch celebrates Alan Turing

Monday, January 05, 2015 - 00:28

The actor talks about the famed mathematician's life and career. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Award-winning actor Benedict Cumberbatch, the lead in the Oscar-tipped "The Imitation Game", says the film's World War Two story still resonates strongly today. "The Imitation Game", a biopic about British mathematician and code-breaker Alan Turing, which also stars Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode and Charles Dance, has earned rave reviews and made millions of pounds at the U.K. box office. In the film, Turing is the brilliant mathematician at Bletchley Park who deciphers the German Enigma code, helping to bring the conflict to an end. He took his own life at 41 after he was convicted for being a homosexual. Turing received a posthumous royal pardon in December 2013, but many believe more should be done to remember his part in the war effort. With no footage to draw from for Turing's manner and speech, Cumberbatch had to undertake exhaustive biographical research to portray the highly complex character. For many decades, Turing's contributions during the war were kept under lock and key by the British security organisations because it was deemed too important and sensitive. Despite his relatively short life, Turing - who is often hailed as the father of computer science - advanced the field of artificial intelligence and paved the way for modern technology. Cumberbatch said audiences would appreciate Turing's "profound" effect: "It's a cracking thriller as well. It's funny, it's moving as well. It's a very tragic story. And this man's effect has been profound on all of our lives, whether you're a member of the gay community, whether you're a computer scientist or somebody who's just a laptop or iPad or whatever user. You know somebody who interacts with technology on a daily basis owes something of that to Alan Turing. The algorithms he wrote for cracking the Enigma code in the Second World War are the same as search engines do now." "The Imitation Game" rolls out in cinemas across Europe in January.

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Cumberbatch celebrates Alan Turing

Monday, January 05, 2015 - 00:28