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Anti-terror police hunt for Paris killers in eastern French city of Reims

Wednesday, January 07, 2015 - 00:52

Heavily armed French anti-terror forces scour Reims in hunt for three men wanted in connection with attack on satirical magazine in which 12 people died. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Police were hunting three French nationals, including two brothers from the Paris region, after suspected Islamist gunmen killed 12 people at a satirical magazine on Wednesday, a police official and government source said. Anti-terrorism police searched an apartment in the north-eastern city of Reims. Police issued a document to forces across the region saying the three men were being sought for murder in relation to the Charlie Hebdo attack. The document, reviewed by a Reuters correspondent, named them as Said Kouachi, born in 1980, Cherif Kouachi, born in 1982, and Hamyd Mourad, born in 1996 who is from Reims, while the Kouachi brothers are from the Paris region. The hooded attackers stormed the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a weekly known for lampooning Islam and other religions, in the most deadly militant attack on French soil in decades. French police staged a huge manhunt for the attackers who escaped by car after shooting dead some of France's top cartoonists as well as two police officers. About 800 soldiers were brought in to shore up security across the capital. The police source said one of them had been identified by his identity card which had been left in the getaway car. The police source said one of the brothers had previously been tried on terrorism charges. Cherif Kouachi was charged with criminal association related to a terrorist enterprise in 2005 after he had been arrested before leaving for Iraq to join Islamist militants. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison in 2008, according to French media. Charlie Hebdo (Charlie Weekly) is well known for courting controversy with satirical attacks on political and religious leaders of all faiths and has published numerous cartoons ridiculing the Prophet Mohammad. Jihadists online repeatedly warned that the magazine would pay for its ridicule. France last year reinforced its anti-terrorism laws and was on alert after calls from Islamist militants to attack its citizens and interests in reprisal for French military strikes on Islamist strongholds in the Middle East and Africa.

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Anti-terror police hunt for Paris killers in eastern French city of Reims

Wednesday, January 07, 2015 - 00:52