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New approach for royal tailor

Monday, January 12, 2015 - 01:48

After 240 years of trading one of the oldest tailors in Britain has adopted a far more modern approach to promoting its fashion as Ciara Lee reports

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It's one of the oldest and most traditional tailors in London's historic Savile Row. But the showing of 240-year-old Gieves and Hawkes' most recent collection was far from conventional. Male models wearing the latest autumn/winter designs were encouraged to interact with buyers and journalists at London's Men's fashion week. Gieves and Hawkes' creative director Jason Basmajian. (SOUNDBITE) (English) GIEVES & HAWKES CREATIVE DIRECTOR, JASON BASMAJIAN, SAYING: "For us it really is about putting Gieves & Hawkes on a world stage. It's sort of entering into the fashion system and presenting something and what we've done with the brand is to try to take something that's very historical and bring it forward and make it relevant and modern and by presenting in London Collections: Men we're able to get across to a global audience." And if there is one thing that attracts certain international markets, it's a link to the British royal family. Gieves & Hawkes has three royal warrants from The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh, and The Prince of Wales. (SOUNDBITE) (English) GIEVES & HAWKES CREATIVE DIRECTOR, JASON BASMAJIAN, SAYING: "We've dressed so many heads of state, so many men of influence; you know, Churchill, Nelson, I think every crowned head of the UK since George III, we've held three royal warrants for many years, we do a lot of military, we dress many of the current royal households. It is quite an honour. The brand in institutional but what's important is to keep the house moving forward - not to rest on just those historical laurels or that patrimony but to keep the brand vibrant and living." London's Men's fashion week was founded three years ago in response to a growing menswear industry. Gieves and Hawkes says the boom is partly down to social media and digital magazines. They certainly weren't around when the tailor made its first suit back in 1771.

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New approach for royal tailor

Monday, January 12, 2015 - 01:48