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Boehner signs Keystone pipeline bill

Friday, February 13, 2015 - 01:17

House Speaker John Boehner signs the Keystone pipeline bill and urges the president not to veto it. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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House Speaker John Boehner signed the Keystone XL pipeline bill on Friday after the Republican-led Congress gave it final passage earlier in the week. The measure will now go to President Barack Obama, who has vowed to veto it. Before signing the bill, Boehner urged Obama to "do the right thing" and approve the legislation, which he argued will boost America's economy. "It's pretty simple. Keystone XL pipeline is a good idea for our economy and it's a good idea for our country. Members of both parties know it. They've put politics aside to pass this very important bill. The president's own State Department says this project will create up to 42,000 direct jobs. Many labor unions know it. They say, Keystone, this isn't a pipeline, it's a lifeline for America's construction workers. And the overwhelming majority of the American people know it as well," said Boehner. "So to the president I would just say this -- do the right thing. Sign this bill and help us create more jobs in America to create a healthier economy," he added. The bill passed by 270-152 in the House of Representatives on Wednesday, with only one Republican voting against it and 29 Democrats for it. The legislation passed in the Senate in late January. Obama, a Democrat, opposes the bill because it would pluck the approval process from his administration. He wants the State Department to finish its assessment of the pipeline and make his own decision on it afterward. Keystone supporters in the Senate are at least four votes shy of the two-thirds vote needed to override an Obama veto. They have vowed to attach language approving the pipeline in a spending bill or other legislation later in the year that the president would find difficult to reject. TransCanada Corp's pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of mostly Canadian oil sands petroleum to Nebraska en route to refineries and ports along the U.S. Gulf. It has been pending for more than six years. Supporters say it would create thousands of construction jobs. Opponents say the pipeline would increase carbon pollution and could spill into an aquifer that provides much of the freshwater in the Great Plains agricultural states. Obama has said Keystone should not be approved if it significantly raises emissions linked to global warming, and he has downplayed the number of jobs it would create. The State Department is expected soon to issue its recommendation to Obama after it received comments earlier this month from several federal agencies on whether Keystone is in the country's interest.

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Boehner signs Keystone pipeline bill

Friday, February 13, 2015 - 01:17