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Inequality facing minority men behind unrest in Baltimore, Ferguson -Obama

Monday, May 04, 2015 - 01:07

U.S. President Barack Obama says odds are stacked against black and Latino men and vows to continue work on inequality after his presidency. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Following a week of racially charged protests in Baltimore, U.S. President Barack Obama on Monday (May 4) said obstacles facing minority men from birth put them in a position of having "the odds stacked against them." Obama said black and Latino men feel that disadvantage, and he credited their sense of frustration about their lives and opportunities for the intensity of recent protests around the country. He spoke at Lehman College in the Bronx to announce the launch of My Brother's Keeper Alliance, a nonprofit organization that is a spinoff of a White House initiative to increase opportunities for young minority men. "That sense of unfairness, powerlessness, people not hearing their voices, that's helped fuel some of the protests that we've seen in places like Baltimore, Ferguson and right here in New York," Obama said, referring to demonstrations that followed the deaths of unarmed black men after interactions with police. Obama said he would continue to work on the issue after his presidency, a possible foreshadowing of his future involvement with My Brother's Keeper Alliance. "This will remain a mission for me and for Michelle not just for the rest of my presidency but for the rest of my life," he said.

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Inequality facing minority men behind unrest in Baltimore, Ferguson -Obama

Monday, May 04, 2015 - 01:07