Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

video Finance Videos

Cameron presents bid for new EU terms

Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 02:10

David Cameron takes his case for renegotiating Britain's membership of the European Union to a leaders' summit in Brussels. With the Greek crisis and the divisive issue of migration dominating the talks, the UK prime minister may have to fight for a sympathetic hearing. David Pollard reports.

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

At 89, Queen Elizabeth is old enough to remember a Europe divided by conflict. As the visiting British monarch told her German hosts. (SOUNDBITE) (English) QUEEN ELIZABETH II, SAYING: "We have witnessed how quickly things can change for the better but we know that we must work hard to maintain the benefits of the post-war world. We know that division in Europe is dangerous and that we must guard against it in the west, as well as in the east of our continent." The remarks weren't directly aimed at David Cameron. But he may think them over as he heads for another dinner with EU leaders. He's due there to present his case for renegotiating Britain's membership of the EU. Where the talk may be of a more urgent issue. Mike Ingram is a strategist at BGC. SOUNDBITE (English) BGC MARKET STRATEGIST, MIKE INGRAM, SAYING: ''The whole Grexit episode has highlighted at some level just how fragile the European Union is and also the euro itself. So there is widespread recognition within Europe that there has to be reform.'' Any renegotiation will be tough. That at least is the warning from Belgium. And echoed by France: telling Cameron he can't expect an EU ''a la carte system.'' On Cameron's menu of choice would be opt outs from certain EU rules - and from ''ever-closer union''. And limits to welfare for workers from outside Britain. Will he get them? SOUNDBITE (English) BGC MARKET STRATEGIST, MIKE INGRAM, SAYING: ''It'll all be couched in diplomatic language. I would be surprised if he didn't get some concessions. Whether they'll be meaningful concessions, of course, is highly debatable.'' The other - divisive - business of the summit: migration. Leaders split over how to deal with that growing burden. Recent scenes of desperate bids to board UK-bound lorries at Calais give Cameron a new challenge at home: how to present the case for staying IN Europe. The so-called Calais effect, it's feared, playing to the OUTs. And - that at a time when more businesses - BT and easyJet the latest among them - are calling on Cameron not to risk a Brexit. With a UK referendum on the issue by the end of 2017, Cameron's still banking that won't happen. A Grexit - the damage from that can be contained, it's argued. The departure of the world's sixth largest economy from the EU altogether a different prospect.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Cameron presents bid for new EU terms

Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 02:10