Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

video Finance Videos

Consumers failing to curb CO2 emissions

Monday, December 14, 2015 - 01:37

Eat misshapen veg, wash clothes in cold water, drive more slowly and recycle? It's perhaps no surprise that companies say persuading consumers to go green is a big challenge. Emily Withers reports.

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

As negotiators seek a deal to reduce global emissions at the U.N. talks in Paris we've heard promises to help save the planet from world leaders to CEO's of top business'. But companies say persuading their customers to go green is a hard sell. The fashion chain says the way clothes are cared for accounts to more than a quarter of the emissions during a garment's life. Many business's argue they can only do so much and it's up to consumers to change the way they use their products. The company behind Dove soap, estimates that customers are responsible for 70 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with its products... They've been trying to promote shorter showers - admittedly with limited success. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FORUM FOR THE FUTURE, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, DR. SALLY UREN, SAYING: "In terms of trying to engage a consumer to use a product differently it's really hard." Sally Uren heads up Forum for the Future, a non-profit that works with business and government on sustainability issues. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FORUM FOR THE FUTURE, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, DR. SALLY UREN, SAYING: "You could bring down carbon emissions in the manufacturing phase to almost zero but that would then be offset completely if someone then uses the product in a way that uses lots of water in the shower which uses a lot of energy." A big issue is waste -- tonnes of food and clothing still choke landfills One London fashion designer is trying to encourage us to fill our closets with clothes that last. Tom Cridland has created a sweatshirt he promises will last for three decades. (SOUNDBITE) (English) CREATOR OF 30 YEAR SWEATSHIRT, TOM CRIDLAND, SAYING: "The mere fact that we're guaranteeing the sweatshirts for 30 years implies that the sweatshirts are made really well and therefore we're not wasting our natural resources, which is the main reason is why the project is good for the environment." Carefully handmade in Portugal - Cridland hopes this cotton crewneck will encourage us all to waste less.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Consumers failing to curb CO2 emissions

Monday, December 14, 2015 - 01:37