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Republican presidential hopefuls revive poverty message

Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 01:40

Republican presidential candidates detail how they would fight joblessness and income inequality at a poverty forum in South Carolina. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) Republican leaders seeking the White House participated in a poverty forum in Columbia, South Carolina on Saturday (January 9), to tout their anti-poverty program, claiming liberal attempts to help the poor have not worked. The forum was sponsored by the Jack Kemp Foundation, named for the late Republican lawmaker who called himself a "bleeding heart" conservative due to his work on housing, welfare and other poverty programs. Often unnoticed amid the debate among Republicans over illegal immigration and terrorism, some of the current crop of candidates put forward details of how they would fight poverty, by minimizing the role of government and boosting the private sector. "Compassion is not measured by how much money you spend through Washington through a big administrative bureaucracy and send it back down to other bureaucrats filling out forms to eventually get back into a community," said former Florida governor Jeb Bush. "Compassion is, in the Greek sense, is acting on your sense of consciousness and the only way we're going to become a more just society is from the bottom up." he added. Earlier this week, Bush unveiled a new welfare reform proposal ahead of the South Carolina forum as part of his campaign to win the Republican nomination for the Nov. 8 election. For his part, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson said "the real answer to poverty is not government but the private sector." Marco Rubio, a U.S. senator from Florida, who often talks about his modest upbringing with a bartender father and a mother who worked as a maid, proposed a new tax credit for families with children. The five top Republicans in Reuters/Ipsos opinion polls - Donald Trump, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Rubio and Bush - have television ads on immigration, terrorism and their backgrounds, but not explicitly about poverty.

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Republican presidential hopefuls revive poverty message

Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 01:40