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Unlocking San Bernardino iPhone puts customers at risk - Apple CEO

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 01:01

Apple CEO Tim Cook says that complying with a court order to help the FBI break into an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters would ''make hundreds of millions of customers vulnerable.''

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BROADCAST AND DIGITAL RESTRICTIONS~**Broadcasters: MUST COURTESY "ABC NEWS EXCLUSIVE" DURING ENTIRETY OF CLIP/ MUST BE INTRODUCED WITH AN AUDIO CREDIT "IN AN INTERVIEW ON ABC NEWS' "WORLD NEWS TONIGHT WITH DAVID MUIR..."/MUST NOT OBSCURE ABC NEWS LOGO OR "ABC NEWS EXCLUSIVE" BUG/FOR NEWS USE ONLY/NO ARCHIVE/NO RESALE Digital: MUST COURTESY "ABC NEWS EXCLUSIVE" DURING ENTIRETY OF CLIP/ MUST BE INTRODUCED WITH AN AUDIO CREDIT "IN AN INTERVIEW ON ABC NEWS' "WORLD NEWS TONIGHT WITH DAVID MUIR..."/MUST NOT OBSCURE ABC NEWS LOGO OR "ABC NEWS EXCLUSIVE" BUG/FOR NEWS USE ONLY/NO ARCHIVE/NO RESALE) STORY: Apple chief Tim Cook on Wednesday (February 24) said that complying with a court order to help the FBI break into an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters would "make hundreds of millions of customers vulnerable" and set a legal precedent that would offend many Americans. "If we knew a way to get the information on the phone that we haven't already given if we knew a way to do this that would not expose hundreds of millions of other people to issues we would obviously do it," Cook told ABC News in his first interview since the court order came down last week. Apple's chief executive officer also said there should have been more dialogue with the Obama administration before the U.S. Justice Department's decision to seek relief from a federal magistrate judge in California. Apple has publicly said it intends to fight the court order and has until Friday to respond. The iPhone in question was used by San Bernardino shooter Rizwan Farook, who along with his wife went on a shooting rampage in December that killed 14 and wounded 22. The Justice Department wants Apple to help access encrypted information stored on Farook's county-owned iPhone 5C by writing software that would disable its passcode protections to allow an infinite number of guesses without erasing the data on the device. Apple has said the request amounts to asking a company to hack its own device and would undermine digital security more broadly.

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Unlocking San Bernardino iPhone puts customers at risk - Apple CEO

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 01:01