Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

video Finance Videos

Child labour poses challenge for Myanmar government

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 01:25

Myanmar's unregulated labour market is rife with child workers struggling to support their poor families. Julie Noce reports.

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

Tun Min slides his boots on every morning and heads to work in the outskirts of Yangon. The 16-year-old Burmese teen is the sole bread winner for his family and earns about eight dollars a day delivering fish to the market. He's been doing this since he was 12, when he had to drop out of school because his mother became ill. I want to become a trader in the fish market he says. I need money to start my business, then I can earn even more money. The demand for labour has risen drastically since the Myanmar economy opened up five years ago. Here about one-in-five children aged 10-17 go to work instead of school, despite laws that curb child labour. Michael Slingsby from the United Nations Development Programme said there's a fine line between protecting children and the demand for economic development. (SOUNDBITE) (English) SENIOR TECHNICAL ADVISER TO UNDP'S URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING BUREAU FOR ASIA, MICHAEL SLINGSBY, SAYING: "I think it should be a priority area but needs to be combined with positive policies. If you try to ban child labour, there's a danger that you drive it underground and people (will) still continue to work very young, but do it in a less open way." Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party which took power this month, said tackling child labour was one of the party's goals.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Child labour poses challenge for Myanmar government

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 01:25