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Cameron explains his "fantastically corrupt" comments

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 00:58

British Prime Minister David Cameron is questioned by Members of Parliament at the House of Commons after he suggests Nigeria was ''fantastically corrupt'' ahead of the global anti-corruption summit in London. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Members of the House of Commons questioned British Prime Minister David Cameron on Wednesday (May 11) on remarks he made during a conversation with Queen Elizabeth, caught on camera on Tuesday (May 10), suggesting Nigeria and Afghanistan were "fantastically corrupt". The comments have so far dominated the build-up to a global anti-corruption summit Cameron is hosting on Thursday (May 12) which Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari will attend. Buhari demanded on Wednesday that Britain return assets held there by corrupt Nigerians, pointing the finger back at London after the prime minister's comment. Buhari has noted the leaders of both countries are working hard to combat corruption. Buhari has a reputation for personal probity and has pledged to crack down on corruption in Nigeria, Africa's top oil producer and most populous nation where generations of politicians have looted public coffers for their personal gain. "Countries like Nigeria and Afghanistan - their leaders are battling hard against very corrupt systems in countries. And in both their cases, they made some remarkable steps forward and that's why I'm so keen to welcome them to the anti-corruption conference here in London. But where I part company with my honourable friend is I don't think it would be right to withdraw the aid that we give because frankly, the problems in those countries, they come back and haunt us here. Whether it is problems of migration or problems of terrorism and all the rest of it, we are a country involved in a dangerous global world and I see our aid budget nought point seven perfect alongside our defence budget, two percent of our GDP, as ways of keeping us safe and prosperous in a dangerous world as well as fulfilling our important moral responsibilities," Cameron told MPs. British police have conducted several investigations in recent years into assets held in Britain by Nigerian politicians, including two former state governors and a former oil minister. One of the ex-governors is serving a prison sentence in Britain after pleading guilty to money-laundering. Nigeria is listed at number 136 out of 167 in campaign group Transparency International's latest Corruption Perceptions Index, an annual ranking of countries in which a higher number indicates a higher level of perceived corruption.

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Cameron explains his "fantastically corrupt" comments

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 00:58