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Candidates to lead Britain make their case

Sunday, July 03, 2016 - 01:29

Two Conservative candidates, in contest to lead Britain after Prime Minister David Cameron leaves the office, face tough questioning by a morning TV show host. Rough Cut (no reporter narration)

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Andrea Leadsom, one of five candidates to succeed David Cameron as British prime minister, said on Sunday (July 3) she would be quick to start the process of negotiating the terms of Britain's exit from the European Union. Asked when she would trigger article 50, the step that will formally begin the process, Leadsom declined to give an exact framework but made clear she thought it should happen as quickly as possible. "We need to get on with it, we need to seize the opportunity," she told BBC television presenter Andrew Marr. "It's about giving certainty to businesses, it's about saying to the world 'we're open for business'. Let's get some free trade agreements started as soon as we can." Leadsom, a prominent "Leave" campaigner ahead of the June 23 referendum which saw Britain voted to quit the EU, has emerged in the early stages of the contest to succeed Cameron as one of strongest candidates from the Brexit camp. The front-runner is Home Secretary Theresa May, who campaigned for a "Remain" vote. May said on Thursday (June 29) she would not trigger article 50 this year. "The next person to lead this country has to somebody who believes in the opportunity of leaving the EU, who genuinely believes our place in the world could be so much better if we leave the EU," Leadsom said. Another leading Brexit campaigner Michael Gove's bid to replace David Cameron as British prime minister came as a complete shock last week after the cerebral justice secretary had given every sign he would back the flamboyant Boris Johnson for the job. "Many news papers, many people see you as someone who has betrayed your close friend Boris Johnson," TV presenter told Gove on the live morning show. "I enjoyed working with Boris during the referendum campaign. I think he has great talents and great abilities. But you need something else to be a prime minister. You need to have this grip, that executive authority, that sense of propose, that clarity. I had hoped that Boris would show that but in the end it wasn't enough," Gove replied. "I knew that by taking that decision all sorts of people would attack me personally, but I love my country, I couldn't recommend Boris as a prime minister. I had tried to make that work, and therefore it would have been a genuine betrayal," he added. Gove and Johnson, the former London mayor and platinum-haired showman long considered the front-runner to succeed Cameron, had campaigned side-by-side on the "Vote Leave" battle bus in the run-up to the EU referendum.

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Candidates to lead Britain make their case

Sunday, July 03, 2016 - 01:29