Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

Video

Tim Kaine warns against being "burned" by Trump

Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 01:47

After formally accepting the Democratic vice presidential nomination, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine says, ''We all should feel the Bern and we should not all want to get burned by the other guy.'' Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Democratic vice presidential nominee U.S. Senator Tim Kaine laid into Republican candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday (July 27) after accepting his nomination. Kaine asked the crowd, "Do you believe him?" "Take it from the guy who co-wrote Donald Trump's autobiography- here's what he said about Trump, quote, 'lying is second nature to him,'" said Kaine. Kaine called out Senator Bernie Sanders and said, "We all should feel the Bern and we should not all want to get burned by the other guy." Kaine helps Clinton check a lot of boxes in the list of requirements for a running mate. The former civil rights lawyer is a Virginian, which could help Clinton win a battleground state in the Nov. 8 race against Trump. Such states are hotly contested because their populations can swing either to Republicans or Democrats and play a decisive role in presidential elections. Kaine is also affable, savvy about foreign policy and has executive experience as a former governor of Virginia and a former mayor of Richmond, the state's capital. Hillary Clinton made history when she secured the party's nomination on Tuesday. When she formally accepts it on Thursday, she will become the Democratic standard-bearer against Republican nominee Trump in the Nov. 8 election. Democrats have buttressed Clinton with a star gathering of current and past party notables. By contrast, many prominent Republicans were absent from the party convention that nominated Trump for the White House last week. Clinton waged another hard-fought primary battle this year, beating off an unexpectedly strong challenge from the left by Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont. Democratic leaders have sought to tamp down lingering bitterness among some die-hard Sanders supporters, and move past unruly displays of dissent that marked the convention's first day on Monday. In a gesture of party unity, Sanders put forward Clinton's name on Tuesday night to make her the first woman nominated for president by a major U.S. party. Other speakers on Wednesday included President Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Leon Panetta, a former defense secretary and CIA director.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Tim Kaine warns against being "burned" by Trump

Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 01:47