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Mealworms and a side of cricket

Thursday, August 11, 2016 - 01:15

A South Korean restaurant is persuading more people to eat insects by mixing extracts from their bodies into food. Yiming Woo reports.

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Creepy crawlies are the specialty of Papillon's Kitchen in Seoul. Oil, powder and liquids are extracted from mealworms and added to dishes like this sweet potato and mushroom pasta. It passed the taste test for customer Bae Su-hyeon. pay (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) 18-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT, BAE SU-HYEON, SAYING: "As the meals were made to be just like any other food, I didn't feel like I was eating insects. This is interesting. I like this." Many people are unwilling to eat bugs, even though they're a rich source of protein, vitamins and fibre. South Korea's government is trying to bring insects into the mainstream, as they're more environmentally-friendly to farm and require less land and water than cattle. Kim Young-wook, the man behind Papillon restaurant and the insect extraction technology, reveals the key to winning over sceptics. ook (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) CEO OF KOREAN EDIBLE INSET LABORATORY (KEIL) AND OWNER OF PAPILLION'S KITCHEN, KIM YOUNG-WOOK, SAYING: "If people taste the food and have a good first impression, and find it delicious, that's everything, because taste speaks for itself." South Korea's insect industry, currently worth millions of dollars, is expected to grow, as more people think of them as the future of food.

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Mealworms and a side of cricket

Thursday, August 11, 2016 - 01:15