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Brexit deja vu for Americans at London's embassy

Wednesday, November 09, 2016 - 01:36

Americans at the election watch party of the U.S. embassy in London feel a repeat of Brexit shock as Republican Donald Trump edged closer to the White House. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: A Brexit-style shock was felt in London's U.S. embassy as expats and Britons watched Republican Donald Trump edge closer to winning the White House on Tuesday (November 9). Trump's series of shocking wins in battleground states such as Florida and Ohio were compared to Britain's unexpected historic vote to leave the European Union in June this year. Polls in both the U.S. election and the EU referendum predicted the opposite to the expected outcome - Hillary Clinton becoming the first female U.S. president, and Britain remaining in the EU. A wealthy real-estate developer and former reality TV host, 70-year-old Trump rode a wave of anger towards Washington insiders to challenge Clinton, whose gold-plated establishment resume includes stints as a first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state. People apprehensively watched the results unfold in London's U.S. embassy, some with tears in their eyes. Malise Sundstrom was one of few Republicans at the embassy party. She voted for neither Trump or Clinton in Tuesday's vote, but is confident her country has made the right decision. "Like Brexit, once some of the uncertainty is removed, markets will stabilize... I think one man, in one election year, in one branch of government, is not going to end the world as people are saying - I think it will be fine," Sundstrom, who is Chairwoman of Republicans Overseas UK, said. Democrat Christine Sweeney, originally from Washington DC and now a student in London, was devastated by the idea of a Trump presidency. "Having witnessed Brexit, and having not expected it, you know I sort of saw it as a warning that something like this can happen when there is potentially a lack of information or representation within the electoral process," Sweeney said. The outcome of the presidential election remained uncertain. Clinton still had a path to reach 270 electoral votes if she could sweep the remaining too-close-to-call battleground states including Pennsylvania, Michigan and New Hampshire, and pull off an upset win in Arizona.

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Brexit deja vu for Americans at London's embassy

Wednesday, November 09, 2016 - 01:36