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Oddly Enough

Rare medieval shipwreck brought to surface

Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 01:10

A fifteenth century ship discovered in the bed of a Dutch river is lifted to be taken to a conservation station built especially for it. Elly Park reports.

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After half a millennium a piece of history is about to emerge from the deep. Dutch archeologist are looking at the remnants of a fifteenth century "cog," a medieval trading vessel used to sail the Baltic and North Seas. The ship, in a rare well-preserved condition, was found by construction workers who were carrying out an underwater investigation to excavate a nearby port. According to experts the boat's metal joints made it sturdier than other contemporary vessels, and allowed them to raise it without fears of damaging the hull. Underwater Archaeologist, Wouter Waldus. SOUNDBITE: Underwater Archaeologist, Wouter Waldus, saying (Dutch) "Once we determined the weight of the cog to be 40 tonnes, then we knew that we had a stable situation and could carry on lifting." The encaged ship, named "Ijsselkogge" after the river delta it was found in, is 20 by 8 metres. Unsurprisingly given its age, the wreck is delicate and will be kept at a conservation platform equipped with a watering station to keep it wet at all times.

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Rare medieval shipwreck brought to surface

Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 01:10