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Exercise plus electro-stimulation boosts calorie burn, study says

6:40am EDT - 02:14

A high-intensity workout coupled with electro-stimulation can help burn up to 30 percent more calories, according to a recent study. Holly Rubenstein reports.

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Working out for an hour a day or just twenty minutes a week? Most of us would likely go with the latter, but they'd need to hook up to an electro-stimulation machine first. A study published in the Anadalusian Journal of Sports Medicine has found that practicing High Intensity Interval Training, combined with electro-stimulation, will generate up to 30% higher consumption of calories than conventional exercise. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) UGR PHYSIOLOGY, PROFESSOR ANGEL GUTIERREZ SAINZ, SAYING: "The results from the last two years show two main things. First, metabolism increases in the days following the integral electrostimulation training. Secondly and very important for runners, professionals or amateurs, training with this high-intensity system of electrostimulation, you improve your performance, energetic efficiency, running economy, and other aspects of fat burning." Electrodes attached to the body cause muscles to contract, thus increasing calories burnt. Javier Lamas is a professional long distance athlete. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAVIER LAMAS, PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE AND STUDY PARTICIPANT FOR SIX 20-MINUTE WEEKLY SESSIONS, SAYING: "When I do my normal training I spend three hours a day every day of the week, every day, every week, and with this electrostimulation I could do the same training but not in three hours, just in half an hour or twenty minutes." But training with electro-stimulation isn't a walk in the park. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAVIER LAMAS, PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE AND STUDY PARTICIPANT FOR SIX 20-MINUTE WEEKLY SESSIONS, SAYING: "It feels like I am doing the final part of the race, like I am in the tenth kilometre and I have been doing the exercise for 18 minutes, and (in fact) I have been running there for just three minutes, in a very low intensity compared to the intensity or the speed I run normally in my training." High intensity work out regimes have become increasingly popular with time-strapped fitness fans who still want results. However, other doctors have warned of the risks involved too, saying it could increase joint and bone damage.

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Exercise plus electro-stimulation boosts calorie burn, study says

6:40am EDT - 02:14