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Fact Check-Video shows fire at Italian Carabinieri barracks not a COVID-19 vaccine warehouse

After mandatory vaccination was approved for security forces in Italy, a video circulated on social media with the claim that it showed a military warehouse set on fire because it stored COVID-19 vaccines.

While the fire did happen, the building was not being used to store COVID-19 vaccines, and there is no credible evidence that the fire was started in response to the mandate.

The footage (here and here) shows a building partially consumed by flames.

“Italy: after the mandatory vaccination for all security forces is approved, the military warehouse where the vaccines were stored magically catches fire,” the video is captioned (here).

On Dec. 15, the same clip was published by an Italian news outlet (here), which reported that it showed a fire that broke out at the Carabinieri police barracks in Tor di Quinto, Rome. The exact location can be seen on Google Maps here: bit.ly/3FrZUtK .

On the same day, a COVID-19 vaccination mandate for police, military, teachers and members of emergency services had come into force (here).

However, there’s no evidence the fire was started in retaliation to the mandate, nor is it true that the building stored COVID-19 vaccines.

In an email, a spokesperson for the Carabinieri General Headquarters told Reuters that the fire broke out in the dormitories of the 8th Carabinieri Regiment “Lazio”.

There was no COVID-19 vaccine storehouse in the building, the spokesperson said.

According to local reports, the fire started in a small stove at the accommodation and spread through one of the buildings (here and here).

The cause remains to be ascertained, though a short circuit of an electrical appliance has not yet been excluded, according to Roma Today (here).

VERDICT

False. A building that caught fire was not used to store vaccines, and there is no credible evidence that the blaze was started in retaliation to the COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

This article was produced by the Reuters Fact Check team. Read more about our fact-checking work here.

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