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Fact Check-Viral video of four doctors answering questions about COVID-19 vaccines contains inaccuracies

A video showing a panel discussing COVID-19 vaccines and including inaccurate claims about them has been viewed at least 146,000 times on Facebook and Rumble.

This article will address the misleading or false claims made throughout the almost 15-minute clip.

THE CLIP

The video was recorded by Jeremy Slayden, who also identifies as “JSlayUSA” and published on Dec. 17, 2021. It is viewable on his Facebook profile ( here ) and Rumble page ( here )

A now deleted Facebook post with the video had garnered over 85,000 views as of the writing of this article. Other iterations can be found ( here ), ( here ), on Twitter ( here ) and Bitchute ( here ).

FALSE INGREDIENTS

The exchange starts with Slayden asking the panel about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccines. In his question, he refers to previously addressed claims by Reuters and other fact-checkers.

Indeed, COVID-19 vaccines do not contain aborted fetal cell lines ( here ), graphene oxide ( here ), ( here ), ( here ) or “self-assembling tentacled nanobots,” ( here , here ).

Slayden references the death of Andreas Noack, a German chemist who alleged graphene was a component of the COVID-19 vaccine. False claims around Noack’s passing have been addressed by PolitiFact ( here ) DW ( here ) and EFE ( here ).

He also mentions the death of a doctor in Chemnitz, Germany which was used online to baselessly reignite conspiracies about the COVID-19 vaccine ( here ).

COVID-19 VACCINES ARE NOT EXPERIMENTAL

One of the panelists refers to COVID-19 vaccines as being experimental (around timestamp 1:50). This is untrue: all available COVID-19 vaccines have been put through safety testing before being rolled out to the public and continue to be monitored ( here )

In the U.S., the Pfizer-BioNTech, Johnson and Johnson and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines were approved under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) as a result of the severity of the pandemic ( here ), but manufacturers still need to apply for full FDA approval ( bit.ly/3qJh1C6 ).

Moreover, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine gained full approval from the FDA for people age 16 and older in August 2021 ( here ). Moderna completed its filing process that same month ( here ).

The panelist also says that because these injections are approved under EUA, the ingredients of the vaccines are unknown. This is inaccurate. The ingredients of the Pfizer-BioNTech, Johnson and Johnson and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines can be seen ( here , here ), ( here, here ) and ( here , here )

COVID-19 AND ATHLETES

There is no evidence currently that COVID-19 vaccines are linked to an increase in sportspeople collapsing or dying due to heart issues such as myocarditis, as previously explained by Reuters. ( here ) ( here ). One of the panelists refers to a list of “over a hundred soccer players” who collapsed on the field (around timestamp 3:05 and 3:55), which Reuters addressed ( here ).

VAERS REPORTS DO NOT PROVE CAUSALITY

Around timestamp 5:28, there’s a reference to data from the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event System (VAERS) to say “almost 20,000 people have reportedly died” in the country weeks after being vaccinated.

As previously explained by Reuters, anyone can add adverse event reports into VAERS ( vaers.hhs.gov/reportevent.html ). The website includes clear disclaimers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that reports in the system do not prove causality until investigated further, and that they may contain “incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental, or unverifiable,” information.

A Reuters article about the platform and how it has been frequently referenced by those questioning vaccine safety throughout the arrival of COVID-19 vaccines is viewable ( here ).

ANIMAL TRIALS WERE NOT SKIPPED

Around timestamp 7:58, the video claims COVID-19 vaccines were never studied in animals. Reuters previously addressed this false claim ( here ).

Information about the Pfizer and BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson and Johnson trials in animals is viewable ( here ), ( here ), ( here ), ( here ) and ( here ).

INGREDIENTS OF PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE (COMIRNATY) HAVE BEEN DISCLOSED

One of the panelists also falsely suggests the Comirnaty vaccine is different to the Pifzer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Reuters tackled similar claims on Aug. 27, that emerged after the announcement of the new marketed name ( here ).

“They haven’t even disclosed what’s in the Comirnaty,” he says around timestamp 8:31

The FDA states that Comirnaty has the same formulation as the EUA-approved (Emergency Use Authorization) Pfizer vaccine and is interchangeable for the purposes of administration ( here , bit.ly/3ej9cvP ). Its ingredients are viewable on page 18 ( here ).

SPIKE PROTEINS PRODUCED BY MRNA COVID-19 VACCINES ARE NOT TOXIC

Experts previously contacted by Reuters in June 2021 ( here ) concurred there’s no evidence that the spike proteins created in response to mRNA vaccines are harmful to the body.

Nebraska Medicine explains ( here ) that these spike proteins “last up to a few weeks” in the body. “The immune system quickly identifies, attacks and destroys the spike proteins because it recognizes them as not part of you.” Subsequently, this is how the body will react if encountering SARS-CoV-2.

Another Reuters fact-check article addressed similar allegations on spike proteins being “cytotoxic” can be seen ( here ).

VERDICT

Misleading. This 14-minute clip contains misleading and false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines.

This article was produced by the Reuters Fact Check team. Read more about our fact-checking work here.

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