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Fact check: Document does not show the COVID-19 vaccine will be used for depopulation

A social media post has claimed that a document providing information about the Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine shows that the jab will be used for depopulation. This is false.

Reuters Fact Check. REUTERS

It follows the announcement on Dec. 1 that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine had been approved for use in the UK (here).

The post, seen here, shows a document from the UK government that gives advice about the vaccine to healthcare workers.

Specifically, it shows a section titled “Fertility, pregnancy and lactation”, which recommends that the vaccine should not be used during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

“We’ve all heard about the depopulation vaccine”, the caption of the post reads. “Well here is the proof. This ISNT about covid”. Similar claims can be seen in other social media posts.

While the document is legitimate, and can be seen (here), this does not show that the vaccine is being used for depopulation.

The document recommends that the vaccine should not be used during pregnancy and breastfeeding due to limited trial data, and simply notes that there is an absence of data on fertility effects.

On Dec. 3, The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), which advises the UK government, published a report that says: “There are no data as yet on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnancy, either from human or animal studies. Given the lack of evidence, JCVI favours a precautionary approach, and does not currently advise COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy” (here).

The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) previously told Reuters that it does not anticipate any specific safety concerns from the new vaccines, based on reports from clinical trials (here).

VERDICT

False. The document does not show that the vaccine is being used for depopulation. It instead states that it hasn’t been tested on pregnant women and there is currently there is no data on fertility effects. The MHRA says it does not anticipate any specific safety concerns from the new vaccines based on clinical trial reports.

This article was produced by the Reuters Fact Check team. Read more about our work to fact-check social media posts here .

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