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High-tech cheaters jailed in China
April 3, 2009 / 4:50 PM / 9 years ago

High-tech cheaters jailed in China

BEIJING (Reuters) - Eight Chinese who used high-tech communications equipment, including mobile phones and wireless earpieces, to help their children cheat at university entrance exams have been jailed on state secret charges, local media said.

<p>Middle school students review for their college entrance examination at a classroom in Anxian county, Sichuan province June 28, 2008. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV</p>

The eight, from the wealthy eastern province of Zhejiang, got together in 2007 to plot how to help their children as “they knew their achievements were not ideal,” the official Legal Daily said.

One of the parents hired university students to provide answers which were sent to the children via wireless earphones while they were in the exam room, the report said.

But their ruse was discovered after police detected “abnormal radio signals” near the school, the newspaper said.

The parents were given jail terms ranging from six months to three years after being found guilty of illegally obtaining state secrets, it added, without saying what happened to their children.

China’s college entrance exams, or “gaokao,” are fiercely competitive tests.

Stories of cheating surface every year, despite stiff penalties. Students reportedly pay for leaked exam papers, smuggle in mobile phones and electronic dictionaries, or pay others to take the exam for them.

Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Sugita Katyal

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