November 25, 2018 / 1:59 AM / 20 days ago

Ex-Vikings DT Floyd withdraws grievance

Former Minnesota Vikings defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd has withdrawn the grievance that he filed with the NFL Players Association against the team, according to a report.

FILE PHOTO: Sharrif Floyd from the University of Florida holds up a Minnesota Vikings jersey after being selected by the Vikings as the 23rd overall pick in the 2013 National Football League (NFL) Draft at Radio City Music Hall in New York April 25, 2013. REUTERS/Adam Hunger/File Photo

Floyd had filed the complaint because the Vikings had put him on the non-football injury list in 2017 instead of the physically-unable-to-perform list. Had he been on the latter list, he would have received his full salary of $6.76 million. Players on the non-football injury list are not required to be paid, though the Vikings had committed to giving him $2 million.

The withdrawal freed up a chunk of salary cap space for the Vikings, who jumped from $280,000 in available salary cap to more than $4.2 million, according to the Star Tribune.

Floyd, 26, was a first-round pick (No. 23 overall) by the Vikings in 2013, but his career ended in 2016 after surgery for a knee injury. He has filed suit against famed orthopedist Dr. James Andrews over what he contends was a knee surgery gone wrong.

The dismissal of the grievance does not affect the status of the lawsuit.

Floyd filed the $180 million lawsuit earlier this month against Andrews, the Andrews Institute for Orthopedic Surgery and others, claiming a 2016 routine arthroscopic procedure turned into a career-ending operation.

Floyd’s attorney, Brad Sohn, said Floyd was expecting a scope of his knee in 2016 with a recovery time of no more than one month.

Once on the operating table, doctors determined Floyd needed microfracture knee surgery, described Sohn in interviews with multiple outlets earlier this month.

When surgical assistants administered a pain blocker, muscle tissue and nerves around the knee were paralyzed, Floyd claims.

Sohn told ESPN.com the $180 million figure is based on projected career earnings.

—Field Level Media

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