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Banks

GSK starts big African study of injectable drug to prevent HIV

FILE PHOTO: A GlaxoSmithKline logo is seen outside one of its buildings in west London, February 6, 2008. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo

(Reuters) - ViiV Healthcare, GlaxoSmithKline Plc’s HIV unit, said on Thursday it started an African study to evaluate long-acting injectable drug for the prevention of HIV infection in sexually active women.

The cabotegravir study seeks to enrol 3,200 women aged 18 to 45 years from sub-Saharan African countries, ViiV Healthcare said in a statement.

The HPTN 084 Phase III study will evaluate injections given every two months, ViiV Healthcare said.

The study is being conducted through a public-private funding by ViiV Healthcare, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the company said.

Viiv Healthcare in 2016 had started a large study on HIV-uninfected men and transgender women who have sex with men to test an experimental long-acting injection for preventing the virus that causes AIDS.

Reporting by Subrat Patnaik in Bengaluru; Editing by Akshay Lodaya

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