August 25, 2011 / 11:17 AM / 8 years ago

Factbox: Defections from Gaddafi's Libya

(Reuters) - Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi is a hunted man as the remnants of his forces make last-ditch stands in the capital, Tripoli, and towns outside, including Gaddafi’s home town of Sirte.

His hold on power has been gradually slipping since the revolt began last February and gathered momentum as more of his ministers and associates left the regime.

Here are details of some of the figures who have defected:

MAJOR GENERAL MUSTAFA KHARROUBI:

— A rebel official told Al Arabiya television Thursday that Kharroubi, a member of Gaddafi’s revolutionary command, has turned himself in to rebels.

GENERAL KHALIFAH MOHAMMED ALI:

— The deputy director of foreign security in the Libyan intelligence service, General Ali told Al Arabiya television on August 24: “I put myself in the service of the nation and call on generals and soldiers who are the sons of Libya to join the 17th February revolution.”

MOHAMMED HIJAZI:

— Libya’s health minister, in a separate interview later on August 24, said he had been planning to leave for two months. “But I did not feel safe for my life,” he said.

AL BAGHDADI ALI AL-MAHMOUDI:

— Libya’s prime minister arrived on the Tunisian island of Djerba late on August 21. He had been in the job since 2006.

NASSER AL-MABROUK ABDULLAH:

— A senior Gaddafi security official, he arrived in Cairo with nine relatives on August 15, telling Egyptian officials he was on holiday.

ALI AL-AMIN MANFUR:

— Labor Minister Manfur told delegates at a Geneva conference of the International Labor Organization on June 7 that he was defecting.

SHOKRI GHANEM:

— Chairman of Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) and the OPEC country’s top oil official, Ghanem defected in Rome on June 1.

ALI ABDUSSALM TREKI:

— On March 31, Treki, a former foreign minister whom Gaddafi had appointed his U.N. ambassador, refused to take up any official position and condemned the “spilling of blood.”

MOUSSA KOUSSA:

— On March 30, Foreign Minister Moussa Koussa defected and flew to Britain in an attempt to persuade other officials in Gaddafi’s government to defect.

ABDUL-RAHMAN AL-ABBAR:

— Prosecutor-general told al Arabiya television on February 25 he was joining the opposition.

ABDEL FATTAH YOUNES:

— Younes was a close associate of Libyan leader Gaddafi for more than four decades after helping him take power in a 1969 coup. In a statement on February 22, Younes announced he had relinquished the post of interior minister and defected to the opposition, joining the “revolution” against Gaddafi.

— His death was announced by Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebels’ Transitional National Council (NTC), who said he had been shot by assailants on July 28.

MUSTAFA ABDEL JALIL:

— Jalil, who was justice minister in the Gaddafi regime, quit on February 21 over what he regarded as the excessive use of violence used against Benghazi protesters. He was appointed head of the NTC, which was formed on March 5 and has gained recognition by more than 40 countries including the International Contact group on Libya.

NURI AL-MISMARI:

— On February 21, Nuri al-Mismari, at Gaddafi’s side for almost 40 years, resigned from his post as chief of state protocol.

YOUSSEF SAWANI:

— Sawani was a senior aide to Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, a son of the Libyan leader. He resigned on February 20 to protest against the violence sweeping the country.

Reporting by David Cutler, London Editorial Reference Unit

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