October 9, 2018 / 12:19 PM / 2 months ago

Tuesday Morning Briefing

Brett Kavanaugh gets to work at the Supreme Court, Hurricane Michael takes aim at Florida and South Korea says North Korea wants to ‘ardently welcome’ Pope Francis.

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg

Highlights

Just three days after he was narrowly confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court despite facing allegations of sexual assault, Brett Kavanaugh is set to take his seat on the bench on Tuesday morning, solidifying a conservative majority for years to come.

Hurricane Michael was expected to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico, taking aim at the Florida panhandle, where residents were implored to get out of harm’s way ahead of life-threatening waves, winds and rains.

Trump will seek to lift a federal ban on summer sales of higher-ethanol blends of gasoline, a senior White House official said, delivering on a move long-sought by anxious Midwest farmers ahead of November’s elections.

World

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks during joint news conference in Pyongyang, North Korea, September 19, 2018. Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool via REUTERS

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has invited Pope Francis to visit Pyongyang in a gesture designed to highlight peace efforts on the Korean peninsula, South Korea’s presidential office said.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan called on Riyadh to prove its claim that Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who has been missing since last week, left the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, while the Washington called on Saudi Arabia to support an investigation into his disappearance.

Rescue workers in Indonesia stepped up their search for victims of an earthquake and tsunami, hoping to find as many bodies as they can before this week’s deadline for their work to halt, as the official death toll rose to 2,010.

Commentary

Iran is sending stark signals that escalating U.S. sanctions will not push Tehran to change its foreign policy, writes Maysam Behravesh, a journalist at the TV channel Iran International and an affiliated researcher at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden. Recent Iranian missile strikes in Syria and Iraqi Kurdistan, along with last week's International Court of Justice ruling in Iran's favor, "will likely encourage the Iranian leadership to stay its defiant course."

Wider Image

Harrison Massie, 24, wears a binder as he poses for a photograph by his bedroom window in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., December 31, 2013. "Binders flatten your chest," said Harrison, who wears a binder every day. "After seven years of binding I'm having back, shoulder, collar bone, and sternum issues." Binders can also cause other health issues Harrison said. "I'm very much looking forward to top surgery in the spring." REUTERS/Sara Swaty

For Harrison Massie, transitioning from female to male was never about trading one gender for another. As he embarked on his journey, Sara Swaty, a young photographer and friend, set off to capture it, frame by frame, year after year.

Business

Alphabet’s Google will unveil the third edition of its Pixel smartphone at 10 media events across the world, a hint that it is prepared to expand geographic distribution of a device it hopes someday is as popular as Apple’s iPhone.

China has choked back on imports of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from the United States, traders and analysts said, turning to the Middle East for extra supplies amid the two countries’ trade dispute.

Microsoft is investing in Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab as part of a partnership that the two companies said will allow them to collaborate on technology projects, including big data and artificial intelligence.

Reuters TV

India deports seven Rohingya refugees back to Myanmar for the first time, spreading panic among the community. Reuters’ Krishna Das says officials have amped up fears by threatening to deport anyone the government considers an illegal immigrant.

Deportations spread fear among India's Rohingya
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