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The Road to Brexit

From Reuters Graphics Brexit and the City Ever since Britain voted to leave the European Union there has been more debate about the future of London's large financial services industry than any other sector of the economy. So far there are signs of a slowdown, but there are no indications yet of a transformative decline. VIEW INTERACTIVE › Related Coverage:

Future of Europe

Poland's President Andrzej Duda attends the Polish National Army Day parade...

Poland's president vetoes changes to election rules

Poland's president said on Thursday he would veto a law proposed by the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party that would benefit bigger parties, including the eurosceptic PiS and the main opposition grouping, in European Parliament elections next year.

Commentary

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump walk...

Commentary: The case for UK’s Brexit chaos

Compromise is the loveliest word in democratic politics and beyond – in lasting relationships, labor disputes, international relations. British Prime Minister Theresa May has never more needed the deployment of this lovely and necessary word than now.

Britain's Prime Minister May listens to her Turkish counterpart Yildirim...

Commentary: Why Brexit Britain should look to Turkey

In the long learning curve of Brexit a handful of countries outside the European Union have become shorthand for Britain’s options. Norway offers a continuing place in the single market for those who want the softest form of leaving the EU. Canada stands for the free-trade agreement broadly on offer from the union. Now it’s Turkey’s turn to enter the Brexit lexicon – thanks to its customs union with the bloc.

More Coverage on Brexit

Disorder, deal or dead-end - How will Brexit play out?

The United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union on March 29, yet little is clear: There is, so far, no divorce deal, rivals to Prime Minister Theresa May are circling and some MPs are pushing for a rerun of the 2016 referendum.

UK gilt curve gives another glimpse of 'no deal' Brexit nerves

The risk of Britain crashing out of the European Union without a trade agreement has dragged sterling to its lowest in almost a year this week, and the prospect of a 'no deal' Brexit has also infected the UK government bond market in recent months.

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Weekly Brexit round-up