Edition:
International

Jeffrey Goldfarb

Big miners are steeled against falling iron ore

Sep 20 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - So much for the supercycle. A surge in the price of iron ore earlier this year fueled market chatter about an extended period of commodities demand. The recent reversal in the steelmaking ingredient’s fortunes has been even swifter and may well extend further. Big miners, however, are steeled against the decline.

Sydney Airport sensibly clears deal for takeoff

Sep 12 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - Sydney Airport shareholders can breathe a little easier. After stonewalling its suitor for a couple of months, the board is finally preparing to open the books to a group led by IFM Investors. The company also said on Monday that it would conditionally recommend a revised A$23.6 billion ($17.4 billion) takeover bid. The second sweetener, at A$8.75 a share, represents 6% more than the initial offer in July and a whopping 51% premium to the undisturbed stock price.

BHP brawl tips why nickel will cost pretty penny

Aug 31 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - The last thing BHP boss Mike Henry needs is a fight. He has just unveiled sweeping and complicated plans to reshape the $164 billion miner as the price for the company’s prized iron ore tumbles. Now his agreed deal to buy Canada’s Noront Resources is running into stiff competition from scrappy minerals magnate Andrew Forrest. It’s a fresh sign of just how difficult it will be to push into hot commodities.

Australia’s big boozy spinoff gauges ESG’s S value

Jun 16 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - Woolworths is about to provide a closer look at ESG shopping lists. This Friday, shareholders will vote on the A$55 billion ($43 billion) Australian supermarket chain’s 2019 proposal to carve out its alcohol retailers and pubs. Independence should help both businesses grow faster, but also will distill attitudes on the tricky social elements of investing.

コラム:ワクチン接種率引き上げ、「アメ」より「ムチ」が必要に

Jun 05 2021

[メルボルン 1日 ロイター BREAKINGVIEWS] - 死につながり得るウイルスの感染を避けられるというだけで、新型コロナウイルスワクチン接種を受ける十分な動機になるはずだが、「無料」でビールが飲めるのも大きなメリットではある。

Vaccine lollipops will give way to bitter medicine

Jun 01 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - Averting a deadly virus should be incentive enough to get vaccinated against Covid-19, but there’s also a lot to be said for free beer. Companies and governments around the world are rolling out a growing list of creative perks to spur sluggish immunisation rates. Someday soon, however, rewards for the uninoculated will need to give way to harsher measures.

Star tempts Crown with riskier game of chance

May 10 2021

HONG KONG (Reuters Breakingviews) - The odds are quickly changing in the Crown Resorts takeover saga. Smaller Australian casino operator The Star Entertainment on Monday proposed a merger valuing its embattled rival at A$9 billion ($7.1 billion), including synergies. It’s a deal loaded with assumptions about benefits that would take time to materialise. Even so, Blackstone will be pressured to sweeten its own rival bid yet again.     | Video

Star tempts Crown with riskier game of chance

May 10 2021

HONG KONG (Reuters Breakingviews) - The odds are quickly changing in the Crown Resorts takeover saga. Smaller Australian casino operator The Star Entertainment on Monday proposed a merger valuing its embattled rival at A$9 billion ($7.1 billion), including synergies. It’s a deal loaded with assumptions about benefits that would take time to materialise. Even so, Blackstone will be pressured to sweeten its own rival bid yet again.    

CEO candor would help destigmatise mental health

May 07 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - Sometimes words can speak as loudly as actions. So it goes with mental health. Many companies are mercifully taking employee stress and other psychological ailments more seriously. At the same time, few chief executives have been willing to open up about their personal struggles.

Australia’s border strength morphs into weakness

Apr 27 2021

MELBOURNE (Reuters Breakingviews) - On display in Melbourne’s Immigration Museum is a cartoon from the early 1900s depicting a customs officer harshly denying entry to Father Christmas because of his inability to pass a new language test designed to block non-Europeans from moving to Australia. The exhibit serves as a poignant and timely reminder of a painful history with migrants as the country grapples with the economic repercussions of its latest restrictions.

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