Edition:
United States

Legal

U.S. top court lets states force online retailers to collect sales tax

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen as the court nears the end of its term in Washington, U.S., June 11, 2018. REUTERS/Erin Schaff

States have broad authority to force online retailers to collect potentially billions of dollars worth of sales taxes, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Thursday, siding with South Dakota in its high-profile fight with e-commerce companies.  Full Article 

Migrant families from Mexico, fleeing from violence, listen to officers of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection before entering the United States to apply for asylum at Paso del Norte international border crossing bridge in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

U.S. centers force migrant children to take drugs: lawsuit

Immigrant children are being routinely and forcibly given a range of psychotropic drugs at U.S. government-funded youth shelters to manage their trauma after being detained and in some cases separated from parents, according to a lawsuit.  Full Article 

A man takes a bottle of Coke Zero out of a fridge at a supermarket in Caracas June 11, 2009. The Venezuelan government of U.S.-critic President Hugo Chavez on Wednesday ordered Coca-Cola Co to withdraw its Coke Zero beverage from the South American nation, citing unspecified dangers to health. The decision follows a wave of nationalizations and increased scrutiny of businesses in South America's top oil exporter. REUTERS/Edwin Montilva (VENEZUELA POLITICS BUSINESS)

U.S. court revives Dr Pepper challenge to Coca-Cola 'zero' drinks

A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday revived Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc's challenge to Coca-Cola Co's effort to register trademarks for soft drinks and sports drinks whose names contain the word "zero."  Full Article 

Recent Legal News

U.S. top court lets states force online retailers to collect sales tax

WASHINGTON States may force online retailers to collect potentially billions of dollars in sales taxes, the U.S. Supreme Court said in a major ruling on Thursday that undercut an advantage many e-commerce companies have enjoyed over brick-and-mortar rivals.

Supreme Court finds SEC judge appointments unconstitutional

WASHINGTON The U.S. Supreme Court said on Thursday the way the Securities and Exchange Commission selected in-house judges who enforce investor protection laws was unconstitutional in a ruling allowing more presidential control over pivotal jobs in federal agencies.

U.S. centers force migrant children to take drugs: lawsuit

Immigrant children are being routinely and forcibly given a range of psychotropic drugs at U.S. government-funded youth shelters to manage their trauma after being detained and in some cases separated from parents, according to a lawsuit.

U.S. judge dismisses Charleston shooting lawsuits, criticizes FBI

A federal judge has dismissed 16 lawsuits filed by survivors of a 2015 mass shooting at a South Carolina church who sued the government over the failure of an FBI-run background check system to prevent the purchase of the murder weapon.

New York to sue Trump administration over family border separations - governor

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, a political opponent of U.S. President Donald Trump, said on Tuesday that the state would sue the Trump administration for separating children of immigrants from their parents when apprehended illegally crossing the U.S. border.

EPA chief to face Senate panel in August

WASHINGTON U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt will testify before the Senate's environment committee in August, panel chairman Senator John Barrasso said on Tuesday, where he will face questions about spending and ethics controversies.

BofA's Merrill admits misleading customers, to pay $42 million SEC fine

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK Bank of America Corp's Merrill Lynch unit admitted to misleading brokerage customers about which firms processed their trades and agreed to pay a $42 million fine under a settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced on Tuesday.

Supreme Court sidesteps major rulings on electoral map manipulation

WASHINGTON The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dealt a setback to election reformers by declining to use high-profile cases from Wisconsin and Maryland to curb the ability of state lawmakers to draw electoral districts purely for partisan advantage. | Video

U.S. Supreme Court to review scope of investor protection laws

WASHINGTON The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear an appeal by a New York investment banker banned from the industry by the Securities and Exchange Commission in a case that could limit the scope of those who can be held liable under laws protecting investors from securities fraud.

Supreme court

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen as the court nears the end of its term in Washington, U.S., June 11, 2018. REUTERS/Erin Schaff

Supreme Court sidesteps major rulings on electoral map manipulation

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sidestepped major rulings on whether state lawmakers should face curbs on their ability to draw legislative districts purely for partisan advantage, issuing narrow rulings in cases from Wisconsin and Maryland regarding the practice called partisan gerrymandering.  Full Article 

Fujifilm accuses Icahn, Deason of SEC disclosure violations, Icahn calls claim ‘easily disproven’

Fujifilm filed a $1 billion complaint in Manhattan federal court Monday, accusing Xerox of breaching a $6.1 billion agreement that would have given the Japanese company control of its longtime joint venture partner. Fujifilm claims that when the Xerox board voted to terminate the transaction on May 13, it surrendered “to the whims of activist investors Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason,” who own a combined 15 percent of Xerox’s shares and now control the Xerox board. The Japanese company