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Dechert commercial litigation partner joins UK disputes boutique

1 minute read

REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

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  • Simon Fawell will be a structured finance and financial services disputes partner at Signature Litigation
  • The disputes boutique announced revenue growth for 2021 Tuesday

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(Reuters) - A Dechert litigation partner has left the firm’s London office to join a disputes boutique in the UK capital.

Simon Fawell starts work at Signature Litigation on Nov. 29 as a structured finance and financial services disputes partner, his new firm said Tuesday.

Fawell spent two years as a partner on Dechert’s commercial litigation team and 12 years before that at Sidley Austin. He specializes in banking and structured finance dispute resolution with a focus on derivatives, commercial mortgage-backed securities, asset financing and leasing, according to Signature.

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Signature bills itself as a firm operating without constraints caused by client conflicts of interest.

“Conflict-free litigation platforms have strong appeal to both practitioners and clients alike, and I am excited at the prospect of building on Signature’s increasingly recognised position in the market,” Fawell said in a statement.

The UK boutique now comprises 18 partners and over 100 members in offices across London, Paris and Gibraltar.

Separately on Tuesday, Signature Litigation reported 22% growth in 2021, bringing its revenue to 27.4 million pounds.

A Dechert representative thanked Fawell and wished him well for the future.

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