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Injuries cloud Week 2 action as four quarterbacks leave hurt

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Sep 19, 2021; Miami Gardens, Florida, USA; Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa (1) reacts after being sacked by Buffalo Bills cornerback Taron Johnson (not pictured) during the first half at Hard Rock Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

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NEW YORK, Sept 19 (Reuters) - Four starting National Football League (NFL) quarterbacks departed their respective games on Sunday in an injury-riddled afternoon across the Week 2 schedule.

Dolphins' Tua Tagovailoa was carted off with a rib injury in the first quarter of Miami's 35-0 loss to the Buffalo Bills, while Texans' Tyrod Taylor left with a hamstring injury after securing a 14-7 lead over the Cleveland Browns with a 15-yard scramble to the end zone in the second quarter.

The Browns rallied to win 31-21.

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Chicago Bears' first-round pick Justin Fields took over from Andy Dalton in the second half of their 20-17 home win over the Cincinnati Bengals after the veteran quarterback appeared to suffer a knee injury, while Carson Wentz left in the fourth quarter of Indianapolis Colts' 27-24 loss to the Los Angeles Rams after hurting his ankle.

The quarterback woes were among a spate of injuries among key NFL players on Sunday.

Three-time Pro Bowl linebacker T.J. Watt left during the Pittsburgh Steelers' 26-17 defeat by the Las Vegas Raiders after suffering a groin injury, just days after signing a four-year contract extension worth a reported $112 million to become the league's highest-paid defensive player.

Denver Broncos linebacker Bradley Chubb and the Browns' five-time Pro Bowl wide receiver Jarvis Landry also left their respective games against the Jacksonville Jaguars and Texans with injuries.

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Reporting by Amy Tennery in New York; Editing by Ken Ferris

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