Wimbledon prize money a 'life changer' for Kubler

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Tennis - Wimbledon - All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, Britain - July 2, 2022 Australia's Jason Kubler celebrates after winning his third round match against Jack Sock of the U.S. REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

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July 3 (Reuters) - Australian Jason Kubler said the prize money he has earned by reaching the fourth round at Wimbledon with a win over Jack Sock is a "life changer", adding that it would allow him to invest in himself.

The 29-year-old, ranked 99th in the world, eliminated Sock 6-2 4-6 5-7 7-6(4) 6-3 on Saturday and reached the last 16 of a Grand Slam for the first time, guaranteeing him 190,000 pounds ($230,000) in prize money.

"Yeah, well, a life changer to an extent," Kubler told reporters. "I can see a physiotherapist on the road more often, definitely more weeks with a coach. I give myself more opportunity to hopefully do something like this again."

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Kubler added that he had thought about quitting tennis after an extended spell on the sidelines following a knee injury in 2016, which led to him taking up coaching in an effort to make ends meet.

"There's definitely been tough times, just like I'm sure with a lot of tennis players," Kubler said. "There have been times where I've gone, 'maybe I'll look into something else'.

"The closest would have been when I was doing the coaching. I did a bit of coaching and hitting with some players. I probably did that for two or three months when I didn't have so much money.

"I was actually enjoying it. I was starting to make, for me, make some all right money, and I was like, 'I could really be happy doing this'. That was definitely a moment where I could have stopped."

Kubler will next face 11th-seeded American Taylor Fritz.

($1 = 0.8269 pounds)

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Reporting by Aadi Nair in Bengaluru. Editing by Gerry Doyle

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