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Regulation Headlines

Funds seek to stem outflows in 2008

How to encourage nervous investors back and where to place their money will be the theme of the Reuters Funds Summit based in Europe's fund industry capital Luxembourg on March 18-19.

Renting gains appeal amid U.S. housing tumult

Renting a home rather than owning one may be looking more appealing for people rattled by the U.S. housing market turmoil, but real-estate agents and builders say they do not see the trend persisting for long.

Treasury optimistic on bond insurance

The U.S. Treasury Department is optimistic that problems in bond insurance will be worked out and progress is being made, a senior Treasury official said on Thursday.

Safety chief urges toymakers to get the lead out

The top U.S. product safety regulator on Tuesday urged manufacturers to remove lead from children's products now and not wait for congressional action that would essentially ban the toxic substance from toys.

U.S.-Korea deal seen helping to curb China imports

U.S. lawmakers worried about growing imports from China should approve a free trade deal with South Korea, rather than try to slap duties on Chinese goods, a top Bush administration official said on Tuesday.

Unthinkable housing solutions now thinkable

Plans for sweeping government bailouts and wholesale rewriting of mortgage terms that were unthinkable at the start of the U.S. housing crisis are gaining traction as other efforts to stabilize the market fall short.

Wyndham sees real estate bargains as market dips

Wyndham Worldwide Corp is looking to take advantage of the slump in real estate prices nationwide by picking up properties it can convert into lucrative timeshare resorts, still a strong-growing section of the vacation market.

Securitization seen needing time, oversight

After a spree with subprime mortgages, the hung-over securitized debt market will need time and a firm hand to sober up, said a range of U.S. banking regulators and lawmakers this week.

Medicare chief stands by anemia move

A senior Medicare official said the case for restricting payments for anemia drugs sold by Amgen Inc and Johnson & Johnson has become stronger since the agency made its controversial decision.

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