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Keystone XL: Will EPA Concern Over 61 Water Crossings Go Unanswered?

The Army Corps is not responding to an EPA scientist's letter about 61 water crossings in Texas as the White House works to expedite pipeline approval. By Lisa Song, InsideClimate News An EPA letter that was once a mere blip on the radar for the Keystone XL oil pipeline may now be the last federal regulatory obstacle facing the controversial project. Seven months ago, EPA scientist Jane Watson

The Deadly Consequences of Climate Change

The death toll from global warming-fueled heat waves will rise by 150,000 in America's biggest cities by century's end, study finds. By Robert Krier, InsideClimate News The U.S. death toll from heat waves made more intense by climate change will rise by 150,000—just in the 40 largest cities—by the end of the century. Unless strong measures are adopted to reduce heat-trapping carbon dioxide

Magnolias or Palms? One City Weighs Eco-Benefits of Its Urban Forest

Why is there a plan in San Diego to rip out 107 shade trees, when most of the valuable services they provide will be lost? By Robert Krier, InsideClimate News Rip out mature shade trees and put in palms? That's the debate going on now in sunny San Diego—and it is shedding light on the complexities of a resource that has long been taken for granted but is increasingly recognized for its value: the ur

Enbridge Restarted Ruptured Oil Pipeline —Twice— During 2010 Michigan Oil Spill

Control room technicians 1,500 miles away didn't understand that the 16 high priority alarms that sounded were warning them of a leak. By David Sassoon, InsideClimate News A ruptured pipeline near Michigan's Kalamazoo River leaked oil for more than 17 hours, even as 16 high-priority alarms sounded in the operator's control room in Canada. Control room workers restarted the pipeline twice during that p

Duracell With a Twist: Researchers Find Fix for Grid-Scale Battery Storage

The CUNY Energy Institute is launching a startup to commercialize an advanced nickel-zinc technology for renewable energy battery storage. By Maria Gallucci, InsideClimate News It's no secret that wind farms and solar plants have a reliability problem, and that a clear way to conquer that hurdle is to deploy batteries that store power and deliver it to the grid when needed. But there are two obstacl

Trees Absorb Less Carbon in Warming World Than Experts Have Assumed

A new study says trees are absorbing 3.4 percent less carbon than has been assumed, including models used to prepare the IPCC reports. By Robert Krier, InsideClimate News Trees may not be the planetary saviors people have been counting on in a warming climate. A new study shows that while trees certainly help counteract rising temperatures, they are absorbing 3.4 percent less carbon than had been as

Exclusive Interview: Why Tar Sands Oil Is More Polluting and Why It Matters

Adam Brandt, global expert on the carbon footprint of fuels, explains why oil sands' 20% greater greenhouse gas emissions are significant. By Lisa Song, InsideClimate News The debate over the Keystone XL oil pipeline heated up again last week after the Congressional Research Service issued a report saying the project could raise U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 21 million metric tons a year

Nuke Plant Foes Converging on Tiny Utah Town

"In the long run we are not likely to come to an understanding," said an official of Blue Castle Holdings, the company aiming to build the nuclear plant. By David Hasemyer, InsideClimate News When Alfredo Figueroa stands on the banks of the Colorado River he is reverent out of respect for his tribal heritage yet troubled for future of this overused waterway, which is not only the lifeblood of the

Nuke Plant Foes Converging on Tiny Utah Town

"In the long run we are not likely to come to an understanding," said an official of Blue Castle Holdings, the company aiming to build the nuclear plant. By David Hasemyer, InsideClimate News When Alfredo Figueroa stands on the banks of the Colorado River he is reverent out of respect for his tribal heritage yet troubled for future of this overused waterway, which is not only the lifeblood of the

Frequent Floods Force Farmers to Rethink Age-Old Practices

'Climate chaos' led one upstate N.Y. farm to stop planting in fertile flood plains, a practice farmers have followed for thousands of years. By Robert Krier, InsideClimate News In 2008, Katy Lince watched the vegetables she had nurtured at Hawthorne Valley Farm in upstate New York float down a rushing river that days before had been a peaceful creek nowhere near her crops. "We thought, tha

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