Edition:
United States

India Insight Headlines

Movie Review: Namaste England

Early in Vipul Shah’s “Namaste England”, the hero thinks the only way he can start a conversation with the girl he fancies is if one of his friends marries one of hers! “Who’s willing to sacrifice themselves?” he asks, to which a friend volunteers, allowing Param (Arjun Kapoor) and Jasmeet (Parineeti Chopra) to acquaint themselves at the wedding.

Movie Review: Badhaai Ho

Indians are known to be obsessed with marriage and children, but as Amit Ravindernath Sharma’s comedy “Badhaai Ho” (Congratulations) illustrates, they are equally concerned about timing.

Q&A: Ayushmann Khurrana on finding his sweet spot in Bollywood

More than six years after he made his debut, Ayushmann Khurrana seems to have finally found his sweet spot in the Hindi film industry. Last year, his roles in “Bareilly Ki Barfi” and “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” led some to compare him to Amol Palekar, the 70s Bollywood actor who made an art form out of playing the everyman.

Movie Review: Helicopter Eela

Pradeep Sarkar’s “Helicopter Eela” should have been called “How Not To Parent” and shown as a cautionary tale for those who think hovering perennially over their offspring is a good thing. A shrill, dated and insipid story of a co-dependent relationship between a mother and her son, the film is as enjoyable as having your mother breathing down your neck all day.

Movie Review: Tumbbad

The rain never stops in Rahi Anil Barve’s “Tumbbad”. It pelts the ground relentlessly, rendering everything else insignificant and giving the film an eerie atmosphere and a sense of foreboding. This gloom is what gives the film its best attribute – atmospherics. Barve’s film is redolent with a texture and detail that is rare in Indian films.

Q&A: Arjun Kapoor on how social media devalues celebrities

Arjun Kapoor is preoccupied with his social media feed to an extent that he won’t let a full day of promotional interviews stop him from relentless checking and updating. That’s common for his generation of Bollywood stars. Reuters interviewed him as he maintained his brand.  

Movie Review: Andhadhun

When it comes to crime and thrillers in Bollywood, there is no one better than Sriram Raghavan. From “Johnny Gaddar” to “Ek Haseena Thi” the filmmaker has managed to perfect the Indian thriller genre by borrowing stylistic elements from Alfred Hitchcock and the Coen brothers.

Movie Review: Loveyatri

If the first movie character you play on screen is called “Susu”, it cannot portend well for the future. For all the effort that seems to have gone into Aayush Sharma’s Bollywood debut, the makers of “Loveyatri” overlooked one aspect – the leading man is called by a name that is a synonym for peeing.

Politics Video

Politics News