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Pictures | Tue Oct 13, 2020 | 4:18pm EDT

Americans feel economic crush of coronavirus

Mark Martin poses for a photograph inside the permanently closed Brookville Hotel in Abilene, Kansas, October 10, 2020. Martin's family restaurant weathered two world wars, the Dust Bowl, and the Great Depression, serving up heaping plates of hand-battered fried chicken, mashed potatoes and creamed corn to a devoted clientele. But it could not survive the pandemic. The restaurant, nestled by the highway in Abilene, Kansas, closed permanently on Sept. 25, after struggling to break even amid shutdowns caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. "We're kind of in shock that this will be the end of it for us," said Martin, the fourth generation to run the Brookville Hotel, a name that reflects its origins as a small hotel in nearby Brookville, Kansas that his family acquired in 1894.

REUTERS/Arin Yoon

Mark Martin poses for a photograph inside the permanently closed Brookville Hotel in Abilene, Kansas, October 10, 2020. Martin's family restaurant weathered two world wars, the Dust Bowl, and the Great Depression, serving up heaping plates of...more

Mark Martin poses for a photograph inside the permanently closed Brookville Hotel in Abilene, Kansas, October 10, 2020. Martin's family restaurant weathered two world wars, the Dust Bowl, and the Great Depression, serving up heaping plates of hand-battered fried chicken, mashed potatoes and creamed corn to a devoted clientele. But it could not survive the pandemic. The restaurant, nestled by the highway in Abilene, Kansas, closed permanently on Sept. 25, after struggling to break even amid shutdowns caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. "We're kind of in shock that this will be the end of it for us," said Martin, the fourth generation to run the Brookville Hotel, a name that reflects its origins as a small hotel in nearby Brookville, Kansas that his family acquired in 1894. REUTERS/Arin Yoon
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Tenants and housing rights activists protest for a halting of rent payments and mortgage debt as sheriff's deputies block the entrance to the courthouse in Los Angeles, California, October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Tenants and housing rights activists protest for a halting of rent payments and mortgage debt as sheriff's deputies block the entrance to the courthouse in Los Angeles, California, October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Tenants and housing rights activists protest for a halting of rent payments and mortgage debt as sheriff's deputies block the entrance to the courthouse in Los Angeles, California, October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a caravan to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a caravan to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a caravan to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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Sandra Cruz, who lost her job because of the coronavirus outbreak, and fell four months behind on her rent and is fearing eviction, and her daughter Gabriella wait for a ride after picking up free groceries distributed by the Chelsea Collaborative in Chelsea, Massachusetts, July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Sandra Cruz, who lost her job because of the coronavirus outbreak, and fell four months behind on her rent and is fearing eviction, and her daughter Gabriella wait for a ride after picking up free groceries distributed by the Chelsea Collaborative in...more

Sandra Cruz, who lost her job because of the coronavirus outbreak, and fell four months behind on her rent and is fearing eviction, and her daughter Gabriella wait for a ride after picking up free groceries distributed by the Chelsea Collaborative in Chelsea, Massachusetts, July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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Renters hold up signs as they protest to promote a state government bill (AB 1436) that will prohibit landlords from evicting tenants because of unpaid rent due to the coronavirus in San Diego, California, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Renters hold up signs as they protest to promote a state government bill (AB 1436) that will prohibit landlords from evicting tenants because of unpaid rent due to the coronavirus in San Diego, California, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Renters hold up signs as they protest to promote a state government bill (AB 1436) that will prohibit landlords from evicting tenants because of unpaid rent due to the coronavirus in San Diego, California, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake
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Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a performance to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a performance to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Unemployed entertainers and event workers stage a performance to highlight the effect the coronavirus has had on workers in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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Judith and Jose Ramirez, a housekeeper and an electrician who were both temporarily laid off from their jobs at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel due to the business downturn, sit inside their home with their daughters Mary Amber, 1, and Mary Ashley, 5, in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Garcia

Judith and Jose Ramirez, a housekeeper and an electrician who were both temporarily laid off from their jobs at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel due to the business downturn, sit inside their home with their daughters Mary Amber, 1, and Mary Ashley, 5, in...more

Judith and Jose Ramirez, a housekeeper and an electrician who were both temporarily laid off from their jobs at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel due to the business downturn, sit inside their home with their daughters Mary Amber, 1, and Mary Ashley, 5, in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Garcia
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Residents of Meridian Heights apartments in Northwest Washington display a painted bedsheet protesting for the cancelation of rent due in Washington, August 20, 2020. REUTERS/Sarah Silbiger

Residents of Meridian Heights apartments in Northwest Washington display a painted bedsheet protesting for the cancelation of rent due in Washington, August 20, 2020. REUTERS/Sarah Silbiger

Residents of Meridian Heights apartments in Northwest Washington display a painted bedsheet protesting for the cancelation of rent due in Washington, August 20, 2020. REUTERS/Sarah Silbiger
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Volunteer Cindy Trevino hands bread and pastries to a resident, affected by the economic fallout, during a San Antonio Food Bank distribution in San Antonio, Texas, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Volunteer Cindy Trevino hands bread and pastries to a resident, affected by the economic fallout, during a San Antonio Food Bank distribution in San Antonio, Texas, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Volunteer Cindy Trevino hands bread and pastries to a resident, affected by the economic fallout, during a San Antonio Food Bank distribution in San Antonio, Texas, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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People who showed up to a protest at an apartment complex to stop the alleged eviction of one of the tenants stand in a hallway to keep an eye on the landlord (C) to make sure he does not change the locks to the apartment of the tenant in Mount Rainier, Maryland, August 10, 2020. While Maryland remains under a State of Emergency, evictions are prohibited for tenants who are "suffering substantial loss of income due to COVID-19." REUTERS/Leah Millis

People who showed up to a protest at an apartment complex to stop the alleged eviction of one of the tenants stand in a hallway to keep an eye on the landlord (C) to make sure he does not change the locks to the apartment of the tenant in Mount...more

People who showed up to a protest at an apartment complex to stop the alleged eviction of one of the tenants stand in a hallway to keep an eye on the landlord (C) to make sure he does not change the locks to the apartment of the tenant in Mount Rainier, Maryland, August 10, 2020. While Maryland remains under a State of Emergency, evictions are prohibited for tenants who are "suffering substantial loss of income due to COVID-19." REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Farm worker Cesar Pascual sorts oranges on fruit growers Vince and Vicky Bernard's orange farm as they work to help save the farm in Riverside, California, August 21, 2020. The citrus grower saw more than 3,000 boxes of oranges rot when the coronavirus pandemic forced schools and restaurants to close in March. That loss translated into $36,000. "Lemon sales went from 40, 50 boxes a week to zero. And it was looking increasingly bad," said Vince Bernard. His worst fears, however, were that his trees would die if he were not able to pay a hefty monthly water bill of $7,000. Fighting back tears, Bernard recounted how he went to his old customers and said he would be glad to sell anything at cost, half price or less to stay in business. "I told them ... I'm desperate to keep my life's work going."

REUTERS/Mike Blake

Farm worker Cesar Pascual sorts oranges on fruit growers Vince and Vicky Bernard's orange farm as they work to help save the farm in Riverside, California, August 21, 2020. The citrus grower saw more than 3,000 boxes of oranges rot when the...more

Farm worker Cesar Pascual sorts oranges on fruit growers Vince and Vicky Bernard's orange farm as they work to help save the farm in Riverside, California, August 21, 2020. The citrus grower saw more than 3,000 boxes of oranges rot when the coronavirus pandemic forced schools and restaurants to close in March. That loss translated into $36,000. "Lemon sales went from 40, 50 boxes a week to zero. And it was looking increasingly bad," said Vince Bernard. His worst fears, however, were that his trees would die if he were not able to pay a hefty monthly water bill of $7,000. Fighting back tears, Bernard recounted how he went to his old customers and said he would be glad to sell anything at cost, half price or less to stay in business. "I told them ... I'm desperate to keep my life's work going." REUTERS/Mike Blake
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A Kentucky State Trooper explains to Margaret Wells, of Louisville, that the line of hundreds outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet is closed at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17, 2020. Margaret Wells worked in retail in Louisville and has been unemployed since April. She has not been able to get anyone on the phone to answer questions about the status of her application for benefits. She has three kids and drove about an hour to come to the clinic. "I just need to talk to someone, that's all I came all this way to do," she said.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A Kentucky State Trooper explains to Margaret Wells, of Louisville, that the line of hundreds outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet is closed at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17,...more

A Kentucky State Trooper explains to Margaret Wells, of Louisville, that the line of hundreds outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet is closed at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17, 2020. Margaret Wells worked in retail in Louisville and has been unemployed since April. She has not been able to get anyone on the phone to answer questions about the status of her application for benefits. She has three kids and drove about an hour to come to the clinic. "I just need to talk to someone, that's all I came all this way to do," she said. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Tin Reeves sits as she waits in a line outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17, 2020. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Tin Reeves sits as she waits in a line outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17, 2020. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Tin Reeves sits as she waits in a line outside a temporary unemployment office established by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet at the State Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky, June 17, 2020. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Gary Connell cuts a customer's hair in the aftermath of a nine-week disruption to his hairstyling business due to the stay-at-home order at Salon Plaza in Wheaton, Maryland, near Washington, June 11, 2020. After 15 years working as a hair stylist in other people's salons, Connell opened his "Healthy Hair" studio in Montgomery County, Maryland in early March, sinking his savings into a two-chair shop in a busy mall. It hadn't even been up and running for a full month when stay-at-home orders were issued. Connell, 57, went two months with no income before Maryland loosened restrictions in early June, allowing him to take a limited number of clients. He couldn't access the federal government's small business loan program, or get unemployment insurance.

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Gary Connell cuts a customer's hair in the aftermath of a nine-week disruption to his hairstyling business due to the stay-at-home order at Salon Plaza in Wheaton, Maryland, near Washington, June 11, 2020. After 15 years working as a hair stylist in...more

Gary Connell cuts a customer's hair in the aftermath of a nine-week disruption to his hairstyling business due to the stay-at-home order at Salon Plaza in Wheaton, Maryland, near Washington, June 11, 2020. After 15 years working as a hair stylist in other people's salons, Connell opened his "Healthy Hair" studio in Montgomery County, Maryland in early March, sinking his savings into a two-chair shop in a busy mall. It hadn't even been up and running for a full month when stay-at-home orders were issued. Connell, 57, went two months with no income before Maryland loosened restrictions in early June, allowing him to take a limited number of clients. He couldn't access the federal government's small business loan program, or get unemployment insurance. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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Donica Johns poses for a portrait in her home office in New Orleans, Louisiana, June 13, 2020. Johns hasn’t benefited much from the aid offered to small business owners during the crisis, and she isn't alone. Many other black owned businesses that didn’t have existing banking relationships before the crisis hit are having similar experiences.  At the beginning of the year she was in the process of rebranding her skincare business and shopping for an official workspace that would allow her to expand her company. She was forced to put the expansion plans on hold when the pandemic hit, and has been struggling to replenish her inventory because of shipping delays caused by the virus. Johns applied for a loan from the Paycheck Protection Program but hasn’t heard back. REUTERS/Kathleen Flynn

Donica Johns poses for a portrait in her home office in New Orleans, Louisiana, June 13, 2020. Johns hasn’t benefited much from the aid offered to small business owners during the crisis, and she isn't alone. Many other black owned businesses that...more

Donica Johns poses for a portrait in her home office in New Orleans, Louisiana, June 13, 2020. Johns hasn’t benefited much from the aid offered to small business owners during the crisis, and she isn't alone. Many other black owned businesses that didn’t have existing banking relationships before the crisis hit are having similar experiences.  At the beginning of the year she was in the process of rebranding her skincare business and shopping for an official workspace that would allow her to expand her company. She was forced to put the expansion plans on hold when the pandemic hit, and has been struggling to replenish her inventory because of shipping delays caused by the virus. Johns applied for a loan from the Paycheck Protection Program but hasn’t heard back. REUTERS/Kathleen Flynn
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Customers buy up stocks of wine, food and supplies, including toilet paper, as the French restaurant Montmartre closes after 20 years of operation on Capitol Hill due to financial pressures caused by the coronavirus in Washington, May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Customers buy up stocks of wine, food and supplies, including toilet paper, as the French restaurant Montmartre closes after 20 years of operation on Capitol Hill due to financial pressures caused by the coronavirus in Washington, May 19, 2020....more

Customers buy up stocks of wine, food and supplies, including toilet paper, as the French restaurant Montmartre closes after 20 years of operation on Capitol Hill due to financial pressures caused by the coronavirus in Washington, May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Todd Cornish and Daeshawna Chaney from the Carlton Street Stable use their horse Kitty to transport food to give away to West Baltimore residents amid the coronavirus outbreak in Maryland, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Lee

Todd Cornish and Daeshawna Chaney from the Carlton Street Stable use their horse Kitty to transport food to give away to West Baltimore residents amid the coronavirus outbreak in Maryland, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Lee

Todd Cornish and Daeshawna Chaney from the Carlton Street Stable use their horse Kitty to transport food to give away to West Baltimore residents amid the coronavirus outbreak in Maryland, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Lee
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A woman wearing a protective face mask holds out her shopping bag, at a free food distribution for people in need, outside the West Harlem Group Assistance in Manhattan, New York City, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A woman wearing a protective face mask holds out her shopping bag, at a free food distribution for people in need, outside the West Harlem Group Assistance in Manhattan, New York City, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A woman wearing a protective face mask holds out her shopping bag, at a free food distribution for people in need, outside the West Harlem Group Assistance in Manhattan, New York City, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Cans of food sit in a "Swap Box", a box where people can donate or take free food, beside a road in Windsor, Connecticut, May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Cans of food sit in a "Swap Box", a box where people can donate or take free food, beside a road in Windsor, Connecticut, May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Cans of food sit in a "Swap Box", a box where people can donate or take free food, beside a road in Windsor, Connecticut, May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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Amy Darnell rests after loading a truck for deliveries to food banks and other locations, as people queue for handouts of excess potatoes that would otherwise go to waste due to coronavirus-related supply chain blockages, in an event organized by the Washington Potato Commission in Auburn, Washington, May 7, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder

Amy Darnell rests after loading a truck for deliveries to food banks and other locations, as people queue for handouts of excess potatoes that would otherwise go to waste due to coronavirus-related supply chain blockages, in an event organized by the...more

Amy Darnell rests after loading a truck for deliveries to food banks and other locations, as people queue for handouts of excess potatoes that would otherwise go to waste due to coronavirus-related supply chain blockages, in an event organized by the Washington Potato Commission in Auburn, Washington, May 7, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder
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A sign is displayed on a car in Times Square amid a driving caravan protest calling for workers' rights and cancelling the rent payment during May Day protests in Manhattan, New York City, May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A sign is displayed on a car in Times Square amid a driving caravan protest calling for workers' rights and cancelling the rent payment during May Day protests in Manhattan, New York City, May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A sign is displayed on a car in Times Square amid a driving caravan protest calling for workers' rights and cancelling the rent payment during May Day protests in Manhattan, New York City, May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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A family carries groceries from a Mother's Day food distribution event organized by the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor in Los Angeles, California, May 9, 2020. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon

A family carries groceries from a Mother's Day food distribution event organized by the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor in Los Angeles, California, May 9, 2020. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon

A family carries groceries from a Mother's Day food distribution event organized by the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor in Los Angeles, California, May 9, 2020. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
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California farmer Jack Vessey stands in what remains of his field of romaine lettuce after having to plow it under due to the loss of the restaurant market in Holtville, California, April 15, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

California farmer Jack Vessey stands in what remains of his field of romaine lettuce after having to plow it under due to the loss of the restaurant market in Holtville, California, April 15, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

California farmer Jack Vessey stands in what remains of his field of romaine lettuce after having to plow it under due to the loss of the restaurant market in Holtville, California, April 15, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake
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Dominick Walton, who is homeless herself, serves food to homeless people in Houston, Texas, April 19, 2020. "I started serving meals to the homeless because I understand what it's like not to know where your next meal is going to come from and that's the least that I feel like we can do for our community is to give back," said the 27-year-old. She was recently hired by a non-profit organization that distributes meals to low-income families. REUTERS/Go Nakamura

Dominick Walton, who is homeless herself, serves food to homeless people in Houston, Texas, April 19, 2020. "I started serving meals to the homeless because I understand what it's like not to know where your next meal is going to come from and that's...more

Dominick Walton, who is homeless herself, serves food to homeless people in Houston, Texas, April 19, 2020. "I started serving meals to the homeless because I understand what it's like not to know where your next meal is going to come from and that's the least that I feel like we can do for our community is to give back," said the 27-year-old. She was recently hired by a non-profit organization that distributes meals to low-income families. REUTERS/Go Nakamura
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One-year-old Eileen Tavera and her sheep dog Charlie look out of their vehicle as they await in line with hundreds of residents to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

One-year-old Eileen Tavera and her sheep dog Charlie look out of their vehicle as they await in line with hundreds of residents to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

One-year-old Eileen Tavera and her sheep dog Charlie look out of their vehicle as they await in line with hundreds of residents to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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Some hundreds of residents line-up in their vehicles as they await their turn to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Some hundreds of residents line-up in their vehicles as they await their turn to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Some hundreds of residents line-up in their vehicles as they await their turn to collect groceries from the San Antonio Food Bank in San Antonio, Texas, April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard distribute free milk, offered instead of dairy farmers throwing away excess milk due to lower demand in Boston, Massachusetts, May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard distribute free milk, offered instead of dairy farmers throwing away excess milk due to lower demand in Boston, Massachusetts, May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard distribute free milk, offered instead of dairy farmers throwing away excess milk due to lower demand in Boston, Massachusetts, May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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A pedestrian walks past a closed barber shop in Ward 7 in Washington, May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis

A pedestrian walks past a closed barber shop in Ward 7 in Washington, May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis

A pedestrian walks past a closed barber shop in Ward 7 in Washington, May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Juana Gomez, 50, who said she can’t afford rent and food for her six children after her husband lost his construction job, stands in the rain in a line to pick up fresh food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank giveaway of 2,000 boxes of groceries, in Los Angeles, California, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Juana Gomez, 50, who said she can’t afford rent and food for her six children after her husband lost his construction job, stands in the rain in a line to pick up fresh food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank giveaway of 2,000 boxes of groceries, in...more

Juana Gomez, 50, who said she can’t afford rent and food for her six children after her husband lost his construction job, stands in the rain in a line to pick up fresh food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank giveaway of 2,000 boxes of groceries, in Los Angeles, California, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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People in cars wait in line to pick up unemployment forms in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Bello

People in cars wait in line to pick up unemployment forms in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Bello

People in cars wait in line to pick up unemployment forms in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Dani Tirrell, a black, queer, gender-nonconforming movement-based artist, choreographer and educator, who has had in-session dance classes at Northwest Tap Connection and the University of Washington cancelled completely, poses for a photo at Kubota Garden in Seattle, Washington, April 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

Dani Tirrell, a black, queer, gender-nonconforming movement-based artist, choreographer and educator, who has had in-session dance classes at Northwest Tap Connection and the University of Washington cancelled completely, poses for a photo at Kubota...more

Dani Tirrell, a black, queer, gender-nonconforming movement-based artist, choreographer and educator, who has had in-session dance classes at Northwest Tap Connection and the University of Washington cancelled completely, poses for a photo at Kubota Garden in Seattle, Washington, April 1, 2020.  REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
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People who lost their jobs wait in line to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford

People who lost their jobs wait in line to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford

People who lost their jobs wait in line to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
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Claudia Alejandra, 37, poses for a portrait near a lake in Orlando, Florida, March 6, 2020. Since losing her position at the makeup counter at the Macy's department store in Orlando, Florida, on March 28, Alejandra spends her days trying to secure the unemployment benefits that should have arrived weeks earlier, sometimes placing more than 100 calls a day. The online application, a 10-hour ordeal of error messages, ended with a notice that her identity could not be verified. If she's lucky, she'll reach a representative who will say there's nothing they can do to help. Otherwise, it's a busy signal, or an hours-long wait on hold, followed by a sudden hang-up. Alejandra, 37, cashed out her retirement fund -- $800, a year's worth of savings -- to make the monthly payments on her 2010 Mazda, but doesn't know how she'll pay the rent for her studio apartment or her phone bill. Longer-term goals -- a promotion, a family, a house of her own -- seem even more elusive. REUTERS/Kevin Kolczynski

Claudia Alejandra, 37, poses for a portrait near a lake in Orlando, Florida, March 6, 2020. Since losing her position at the makeup counter at the Macy's department store in Orlando, Florida, on March 28, Alejandra spends her days trying to secure...more

Claudia Alejandra, 37, poses for a portrait near a lake in Orlando, Florida, March 6, 2020. Since losing her position at the makeup counter at the Macy's department store in Orlando, Florida, on March 28, Alejandra spends her days trying to secure the unemployment benefits that should have arrived weeks earlier, sometimes placing more than 100 calls a day. The online application, a 10-hour ordeal of error messages, ended with a notice that her identity could not be verified. If she's lucky, she'll reach a representative who will say there's nothing they can do to help. Otherwise, it's a busy signal, or an hours-long wait on hold, followed by a sudden hang-up. Alejandra, 37, cashed out her retirement fund -- $800, a year's worth of savings -- to make the monthly payments on her 2010 Mazda, but doesn't know how she'll pay the rent for her studio apartment or her phone bill. Longer-term goals -- a promotion, a family, a house of her own -- seem even more elusive. REUTERS/Kevin Kolczynski
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Wearing a face mask and using a stick to keep his distance to help prevent coronavirus spread, a jobless man named Paul panhandles at an intersection in Falls Church, Virginia, April 3, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Wearing a face mask and using a stick to keep his distance to help prevent coronavirus spread, a jobless man named Paul panhandles at an intersection in Falls Church, Virginia, April 3, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Wearing a face mask and using a stick to keep his distance to help prevent coronavirus spread, a jobless man named Paul panhandles at an intersection in Falls Church, Virginia, April 3, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Two women who lost their jobs fill out paperwork to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford

Two women who lost their jobs fill out paperwork to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford

Two women who lost their jobs fill out paperwork to file for unemployment at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 6, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
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Roy Coleman Jr., who works as a personal trainer at the Washington Athletic Club in Seattle and says he has been unable to file for unemployment while the club is closed due to high volume errors on the government's website, with a current call back wait of almost a month, stands for a portrait in Everett, Washington, March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

Roy Coleman Jr., who works as a personal trainer at the Washington Athletic Club in Seattle and says he has been unable to file for unemployment while the club is closed due to high volume errors on the government's website, with a current call back...more

Roy Coleman Jr., who works as a personal trainer at the Washington Athletic Club in Seattle and says he has been unable to file for unemployment while the club is closed due to high volume errors on the government's website, with a current call back wait of almost a month, stands for a portrait in Everett, Washington, March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
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Joining other truckers along Constitution Avenue for a May Day protest against low freight rates amid the pandemic, Shawn and Crystal McIntosh of Wessington Springs, South Dakota, stand beside their truck in Washington, May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Joining other truckers along Constitution Avenue for a May Day protest against low freight rates amid the pandemic, Shawn and Crystal McIntosh of Wessington Springs, South Dakota, stand beside their truck in Washington, May 1, 2020....more

Joining other truckers along Constitution Avenue for a May Day protest against low freight rates amid the pandemic, Shawn and Crystal McIntosh of Wessington Springs, South Dakota, stand beside their truck in Washington, May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Ana Owens, who started Washington's virtual tip jar, an online spreadsheet that helps patrons funnel tips to service workers laid off, poses for a photo with her girlfriend and fellow bartender Katie Gentsch in Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/Raphael Satter

Ana Owens, who started Washington's virtual tip jar, an online spreadsheet that helps patrons funnel tips to service workers laid off, poses for a photo with her girlfriend and fellow bartender Katie Gentsch in Washington, March 20, 2020....more

Ana Owens, who started Washington's virtual tip jar, an online spreadsheet that helps patrons funnel tips to service workers laid off, poses for a photo with her girlfriend and fellow bartender Katie Gentsch in Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/Raphael Satter
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Healthcare employees protest against alleged cuts to paid time off and disability benefits outside Centinela Hospital Medical Center, in Los Angeles, California, May 5, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Healthcare employees protest against alleged cuts to paid time off and disability benefits outside Centinela Hospital Medical Center, in Los Angeles, California, May 5, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Healthcare employees protest against alleged cuts to paid time off and disability benefits outside Centinela Hospital Medical Center, in Los Angeles, California, May 5, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Optician Ali Nelson, jobless after her Washington D.C.-based eyewear store closed due to coronavirus, holds up glasses from her collection at her home in Burke, Virginia, March 26, 2020. The maximum in unemployment benefits offered in the District of Columbia -- about $450 a week -- will not be enough to cover her rent in Fairfax County, Virginia, much less health insurance, groceries and utilities. "This is not sustainable," said Nelson, 52, the primary breadwinner in her household, which includes her veteran husband who is in school and two working kids. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Optician Ali Nelson, jobless after her Washington D.C.-based eyewear store closed due to coronavirus, holds up glasses from her collection at her home in Burke, Virginia, March 26, 2020. The maximum in unemployment benefits offered in the District of...more

Optician Ali Nelson, jobless after her Washington D.C.-based eyewear store closed due to coronavirus, holds up glasses from her collection at her home in Burke, Virginia, March 26, 2020. The maximum in unemployment benefits offered in the District of Columbia -- about $450 a week -- will not be enough to cover her rent in Fairfax County, Virginia, much less health insurance, groceries and utilities. "This is not sustainable," said Nelson, 52, the primary breadwinner in her household, which includes her veteran husband who is in school and two working kids. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Lidia Osorio, who is a line cook at The London Plane and is out of a job after lockdown, poses for a portrait in Seattle, Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder

Lidia Osorio, who is a line cook at The London Plane and is out of a job after lockdown, poses for a portrait in Seattle, Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder

Lidia Osorio, who is a line cook at The London Plane and is out of a job after lockdown, poses for a portrait in Seattle, Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Amy, owner of Farley's East cafe that closed due to the financial crisis caused by the outbreak, stocks coffee to be given to laid-off employees at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Amy, owner of Farley's East cafe that closed due to the financial crisis caused by the outbreak, stocks coffee to be given to laid-off employees at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Amy, owner of Farley's East cafe that closed due to the financial crisis caused by the outbreak, stocks coffee to be given to laid-off employees at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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Tips, money collected from a customer donation fund and a last paycheck for employees laid off from Farley’s East cafe, sits on a counter at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Tips, money collected from a customer donation fund and a last paycheck for employees laid off from Farley’s East cafe, sits on a counter at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Tips, money collected from a customer donation fund and a last paycheck for employees laid off from Farley’s East cafe, sits on a counter at the cafe in Oakland, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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Alfred Brandt milks his Holstein cows on the dairy farm, which has been in his family since 1840 and has been affected by the industry's supply chain disruptions in Linn, Missouri, April 28, 2020. Brandt, along with other U.S. dairy farmers, has seen a drop in milk prices and has been forced to dump excess milk as a result of the closure of schools, restaurants and coffee shops. REUTERS/Whitney Curtis

Alfred Brandt milks his Holstein cows on the dairy farm, which has been in his family since 1840 and has been affected by the industry's supply chain disruptions in Linn, Missouri, April 28, 2020. Brandt, along with other U.S. dairy farmers, has seen...more

Alfred Brandt milks his Holstein cows on the dairy farm, which has been in his family since 1840 and has been affected by the industry's supply chain disruptions in Linn, Missouri, April 28, 2020. Brandt, along with other U.S. dairy farmers, has seen a drop in milk prices and has been forced to dump excess milk as a result of the closure of schools, restaurants and coffee shops. REUTERS/Whitney Curtis
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Journalist Lester Black, 30, who said he was laid off from the Seattle weekly publication "The Stranger" along with about half the newsroom and entire production staff on March 13, is pictured near the Shoreline Soccer Fields in Shoreline, Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/Jason Redmond

Journalist Lester Black, 30, who said he was laid off from the Seattle weekly publication "The Stranger" along with about half the newsroom and entire production staff on March 13, is pictured near the Shoreline Soccer Fields in Shoreline,...more

Journalist Lester Black, 30, who said he was laid off from the Seattle weekly publication "The Stranger" along with about half the newsroom and entire production staff on March 13, is pictured near the Shoreline Soccer Fields in Shoreline, Washington, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/Jason Redmond
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Maria Garcia, 55, stands in the kitchen at Mambos Cuban restaurant, which is being forced to close after 32 years, in Glendale, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Maria Garcia, 55, stands in the kitchen at Mambos Cuban restaurant, which is being forced to close after 32 years, in Glendale, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Maria Garcia, 55, stands in the kitchen at Mambos Cuban restaurant, which is being forced to close after 32 years, in Glendale, California, March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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