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Pictures | Fri Jan 12, 2018 | 7:25pm EST

America's civil rights movement

A man drinks at a "colored" water cooler in a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City, July 1939. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A man drinks at a "colored" water cooler in a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City, July 1939. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A man drinks at a "colored" water cooler in a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City, July 1939. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A sign on a restaurant in Lancaster, Ohio, August 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A sign on a restaurant in Lancaster, Ohio, August 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A sign on a restaurant in Lancaster, Ohio, August 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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The bus station in Durham, North Carolina, May 1940. REUTERS/Library of Congress

The bus station in Durham, North Carolina, May 1940. REUTERS/Library of Congress

The bus station in Durham, North Carolina, May 1940. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A drinking fountain on the county courthouse lawn in Halifax, North Carolina, April 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A drinking fountain on the county courthouse lawn in Halifax, North Carolina, April 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A drinking fountain on the county courthouse lawn in Halifax, North Carolina, April 1938. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A high school student being educated via television during the period that schools in Little Rock, Arkansas, were closed to avoid integration, September 1958. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A high school student being educated via television during the period that schools in Little Rock, Arkansas, were closed to avoid integration, September 1958. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A high school student being educated via television during the period that schools in Little Rock, Arkansas, were closed to avoid integration, September 1958. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A group of people, one holding a Confederate flag, surround speakers and National Guard, while protesting the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School outside the state capitol in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1959. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A group of people, one holding a Confederate flag, surround speakers and National Guard, while protesting the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School outside the state capitol in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1959. REUTERS/Library...more

A group of people, one holding a Confederate flag, surround speakers and National Guard, while protesting the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School outside the state capitol in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1959. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A young boy watching a group of people, some carrying American flags, march past to protest the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 20, 1959. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A young boy watching a group of people, some carrying American flags, march past to protest the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 20, 1959. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A young boy watching a group of people, some carrying American flags, march past to protest the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, August 20, 1959. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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School children entering the Mary E. Branch School at S. Main Street and Griffin Boulevard, in Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia, September 16, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

School children entering the Mary E. Branch School at S. Main Street and Griffin Boulevard, in Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia, September 16, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

School children entering the Mary E. Branch School at S. Main Street and Griffin Boulevard, in Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia, September 16, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Alabama Governor George Wallace standing defiantly at a door while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach while attempting to block integration at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, June 11, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Alabama Governor George Wallace standing defiantly at a door while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach while attempting to block integration at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, June 11, 1963. REUTERS/Library...more

Alabama Governor George Wallace standing defiantly at a door while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach while attempting to block integration at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, June 11, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library...more

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A group viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, in Birmingham, Alabama, September 5, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A group viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, in Birmingham, Alabama, September 5, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A group viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, in Birmingham, Alabama, September 5, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers, including white Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party supporters, holding signs reading "Freedom now" and "MFDP supports LBJ" while marching on the boardwalk outside the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 1964. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers, including white Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party supporters, holding signs reading "Freedom now" and "MFDP supports LBJ" while marching on the boardwalk outside the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey,...more

Marchers, including white Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party supporters, holding signs reading "Freedom now" and "MFDP supports LBJ" while marching on the boardwalk outside the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 1964. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington D.C., September 22, 1963.  REUTERS/Library of Congress

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington D.C., September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington D.C., September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers arriving at Union Station for the civil rights march on Washington D.C.,  August 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers arriving at Union Station for the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers arriving at Union Station for the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Martin Luther King with other civil rights leaders leaders during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Martin Luther King with other civil rights leaders leaders during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Martin Luther King with other civil rights leaders leaders during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers, signs, and a tent during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers, signs, and a tent during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers, signs, and a tent during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A crowd behind a storm fence with police on the other side during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd behind a storm fence with police on the other side during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd behind a storm fence with police on the other side during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A crowd of on the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial with two men in the foreground reading a newspaper with the headline "They're Pouring In From All Over" during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd of on the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial with two men in the foreground reading a newspaper with the headline "They're Pouring In From All Over" during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd of on the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial with two men in the foreground reading a newspaper with the headline "They're Pouring In From All Over" during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A procession carrying signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to bias during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A procession carrying signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to bias during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A procession carrying signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to bias during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A crowd of surrounding the Reflecting Pool and continuing to the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd of surrounding the Reflecting Pool and continuing to the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A crowd of surrounding the Reflecting Pool and continuing to the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Young women with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Young women with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Young women with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Aerial view of marchers in the shadow of the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Aerial view of marchers in the shadow of the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Aerial view of marchers in the shadow of the Washington Monument during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers with signs during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Marchers arrive for the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers arrive for the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Marchers arrive for the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A man in a wheelchair during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A man in a wheelchair during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A man in a wheelchair during the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Civil rights leaders meeting with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. Pictured are (left to right) Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, Congress of Racial Equality leader Floyd McKissick, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice leader Mathew Ahmann, National Urban League executive director Whitney Young, Southern Christian Leadership Conference leader Martin Luther King Jr., Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee chairman John Lewis, American Jewish Congress Rabbi Joachim Prinz, A. Philip Randolph, Reverend Eugene Carson Blake (partially visible), President John F. Kennedy, United Auto Workers president Walter Reuther, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, NAACP executive director Roy Wilkins. 
REUTERS/Library of Congress

Civil rights leaders meeting with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. Pictured are (left to right) Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, Congress of Racial...more

Civil rights leaders meeting with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the civil rights march on Washington D.C., August 28, 1963. Pictured are (left to right) Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, Congress of Racial Equality leader Floyd McKissick, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice leader Mathew Ahmann, National Urban League executive director Whitney Young, Southern Christian Leadership Conference leader Martin Luther King Jr., Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee chairman John Lewis, American Jewish Congress Rabbi Joachim Prinz, A. Philip Randolph, Reverend Eugene Carson Blake (partially visible), President John F. Kennedy, United Auto Workers president Walter Reuther, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, NAACP executive director Roy Wilkins. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Participants marching in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama,  1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Participants marching in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Participants marching in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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A young woman casts her ballot at Cardoza High School in Washington D.C., November 3, 1964. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A young woman casts her ballot at Cardoza High School in Washington D.C., November 3, 1964. REUTERS/Library of Congress

A young woman casts her ballot at Cardoza High School in Washington D.C., November 3, 1964. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress
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