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Pictures | Thu Oct 21, 2021 | 12:03pm EDT

Amid historic drought, California's Hoopa Valley Tribe try to save salmon and a way of life

A 16-month-old boy watches as his father Joseph Marshal and great Uncle Ernie Marshal (R) place salmon on a pole to be put into a smoke house on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, October 14. California Department of Fish and Wildlife officials are completing an unprecedented effort to save more than 1 million Chinook salmon, a campaign that also may help preserve a way of life for a Native American tribe.   

REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A 16-month-old boy watches as his father Joseph Marshal and great Uncle Ernie Marshal (R) place salmon on a pole to be put into a smoke house on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, October 14. California Department...more

A 16-month-old boy watches as his father Joseph Marshal and great Uncle Ernie Marshal (R) place salmon on a pole to be put into a smoke house on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, October 14. California Department of Fish and Wildlife officials are completing an unprecedented effort to save more than 1 million Chinook salmon, a campaign that also may help preserve a way of life for a Native American tribe. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Francine Lewis stands in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California. "If our river dried up, we would die," the Hupa woman said. "We would, because we live off the river."  


REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Francine Lewis stands in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California. "If our river dried up, we would die," the Hupa woman said. "We would, because we live off the river." REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Francine Lewis stands in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California. "If our river dried up, we would die," the Hupa woman said. "We would, because we live off the river." REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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The Trinity River is the largest tributary into the Klamath River. The two converge just outside the Hoopa Valley Reservation, home to some 3,200 people. The Hupas' story is illustrative of how the brunt of climate change around the globe often falls on indigenous and marginalized communities.   

REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

The Trinity River is the largest tributary into the Klamath River. The two converge just outside the Hoopa Valley Reservation, home to some 3,200 people. The Hupas' story is illustrative of how the brunt of climate change around the globe often falls...more

The Trinity River is the largest tributary into the Klamath River. The two converge just outside the Hoopa Valley Reservation, home to some 3,200 people. The Hupas' story is illustrative of how the brunt of climate change around the globe often falls on indigenous and marginalized communities. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Four dams in the Klamath River are due to come down in the next three years, in what officials are calling the largest dam removal undertaking in U.S. history. Dam removal is expected to improve the health of the Klamath downstream of the Trinity, part of the route that Chinook salmon take from the ocean to their upstream spawning grounds, and where the young fish return to the sea.     REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Four dams in the Klamath River are due to come down in the next three years, in what officials are calling the largest dam removal undertaking in U.S. history. Dam removal is expected to improve the health of the Klamath downstream of the Trinity,...more

Four dams in the Klamath River are due to come down in the next three years, in what officials are calling the largest dam removal undertaking in U.S. history. Dam removal is expected to improve the health of the Klamath downstream of the Trinity, part of the route that Chinook salmon take from the ocean to their upstream spawning grounds, and where the young fish return to the sea.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Jill Sherman-Warne, 55, says the river, or hun' in the Hupa language, is "in my heart." "When I want to think calming thoughts, I listen to the river and the birds and the water," Sherman-Warne said, standing on the riverbank and wearing a traditional cap once worn by her great-grandmother. Sometimes, she said, the hun' talks to her, "Saying, 'Help me. Help me or we're gone.'"   REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Jill Sherman-Warne, 55, says the river, or hun' in the Hupa language, is "in my heart." "When I want to think calming thoughts, I listen to the river and the birds and the water," Sherman-Warne said, standing on the riverbank and wearing a...more

Jill Sherman-Warne, 55, says the river, or hun' in the Hupa language, is "in my heart." "When I want to think calming thoughts, I listen to the river and the birds and the water," Sherman-Warne said, standing on the riverbank and wearing a traditional cap once worn by her great-grandmother. Sometimes, she said, the hun' talks to her, "Saying, 'Help me. Help me or we're gone.'"  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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The Trinity River has sustained the Hupa, as Native American people from the Hoopa Valley are known, for centuries. Subsistence salmon fishing endures today. Dam removal won't restore the Trinity itself, though it will help the salmon on which the Hupa depend.    REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

The Trinity River has sustained the Hupa, as Native American people from the Hoopa Valley are known, for centuries. Subsistence salmon fishing endures today. Dam removal won't restore the Trinity itself, though it will help the salmon on which the...more

The Trinity River has sustained the Hupa, as Native American people from the Hoopa Valley are known, for centuries. Subsistence salmon fishing endures today. Dam removal won't restore the Trinity itself, though it will help the salmon on which the Hupa depend.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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A salmon is released after being measured at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish and used by the tribe to gather data on the fish on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Once the tribe reaches a certain quota of a type of fish, like Chinook salmon, they will no longer harvest them when caught in the weir.  
 REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A salmon is released after being measured at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish and used by the tribe to gather data on the fish on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Once the tribe reaches a certain quota of a type of fish, like Chinook...more

A salmon is released after being measured at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish and used by the tribe to gather data on the fish on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Once the tribe reaches a certain quota of a type of fish, like Chinook salmon, they will no longer harvest them when caught in the weir. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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AmeriCorps volunteers show a tribal member a salmon caught by the tribe and available for free on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

AmeriCorps volunteers show a tribal member a salmon caught by the tribe and available for free on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

AmeriCorps volunteers show a tribal member a salmon caught by the tribe and available for free on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal hangs salmon he caught in his smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. To the Hupa, and much of California's environmental lobby, the fish are a bellwether for the overall health of the environment, with benefits for humans and wildlife. Besides sustaining the Hupa and other tribes, salmon provide revenue for a $900 million industry, according to state Fish and Wildlife estimates. 
    REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal hangs salmon he caught in his smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. To the Hupa, and much of California's environmental lobby, the fish are a bellwether for the overall health of the environment, with benefits for humans and...more

Ernie Marshal hangs salmon he caught in his smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. To the Hupa, and much of California's environmental lobby, the fish are a bellwether for the overall health of the environment, with benefits for humans and wildlife. Besides sustaining the Hupa and other tribes, salmon provide revenue for a $900 million industry, according to state Fish and Wildlife estimates. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Paula Gray looks into her refrigerator where she keeps the acorns she foraged for on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Traditional Hoopa culture is a subsistence culture where people fish, hunt and gather the foods they will eat.   REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Paula Gray looks into her refrigerator where she keeps the acorns she foraged for on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Traditional Hoopa culture is a subsistence culture where people fish, hunt and gather the foods they will eat. REUTERS/Stephanie...more

Paula Gray looks into her refrigerator where she keeps the acorns she foraged for on the Hoopa Valley Reservation. Traditional Hoopa culture is a subsistence culture where people fish, hunt and gather the foods they will eat. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Hoopa Valley Tribe fisheries employees work in a weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Hoopa Valley Tribe fisheries employees work in a weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Hoopa Valley Tribe fisheries employees work in a weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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The Klamath and the Trinity Rivers converge near the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Weitchpec, California. The Hupas' beloved hun' is being drained. About half of the inflow into Trinity Lake, which was formed by the Trinity Dam, is diverted hundreds of miles to irrigate rich farmland and slake the thirst of others. 
  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

The Klamath and the Trinity Rivers converge near the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Weitchpec, California. The Hupas' beloved hun' is being drained. About half of the inflow into Trinity Lake, which was formed by the Trinity Dam, is diverted hundreds of...more

The Klamath and the Trinity Rivers converge near the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Weitchpec, California. The Hupas' beloved hun' is being drained. About half of the inflow into Trinity Lake, which was formed by the Trinity Dam, is diverted hundreds of miles to irrigate rich farmland and slake the thirst of others. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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An AmeriCorps volunteer cleans a fish caught by the tribe to ready it for free distribution on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

An AmeriCorps volunteer cleans a fish caught by the tribe to ready it for free distribution on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

An AmeriCorps volunteer cleans a fish caught by the tribe to ready it for free distribution on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Salmon caught on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Salmon caught on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Salmon caught on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California, U.S., October 15, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  
 


REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.   REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.   REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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MyklePole, 14, walks past her father's smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

MyklePole, 14, walks past her father's smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

MyklePole, 14, walks past her father's smoke house on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Hoopa, California.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Albert Gray stands with his granddaughter at his home on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.   REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Albert Gray stands with his granddaughter at his home on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Albert Gray stands with his granddaughter at his home on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Tribal members fish on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Tribal members fish on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Tribal members fish on the Trinity River on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Francine Lewis cuts and cans smoked salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Francine Lewis cuts and cans smoked salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Francine Lewis cuts and cans smoked salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal watches as Francine Lewis cans salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal watches as Francine Lewis cans salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal watches as Francine Lewis cans salmon in her living room on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Joseph Marshal holds his son while standing outside his smoke house filled with salmon with his Uncle Ernie Marshal.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Joseph Marshal holds his son while standing outside his smoke house filled with salmon with his Uncle Ernie Marshal.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Joseph Marshal holds his son while standing outside his smoke house filled with salmon with his Uncle Ernie Marshal.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Paula Gray's store room holds an array of foods that her family foraged for, grew, fished for or hunted for and then preserved in cans.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Paula Gray's store room holds an array of foods that her family foraged for, grew, fished for or hunted for and then preserved in cans.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Paula Gray's store room holds an array of foods that her family foraged for, grew, fished for or hunted for and then preserved in cans.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Salmon caught in a device called a weir on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Salmon caught in a device called a weir on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Salmon caught in a device called a weir on the Trinity River is measured and recorded by a fisheries employee on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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A salmon is measured and recorded at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish, on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A salmon is measured and recorded at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish, on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A salmon is measured and recorded at a weir, a non-lethal apparatus for catching fish, on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal relaxes as his smoke house is engulfed with smoke.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal relaxes as his smoke house is engulfed with smoke.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal relaxes as his smoke house is engulfed with smoke.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal prepares to place raw salmon he caught into his smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal prepares to place raw salmon he caught into his smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal prepares to place raw salmon he caught into his smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Virgil Pole, 72, poses for a photo in front of his work room and smoke house.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal (R) and his nephew Joseph Marshal (L) fish for salmon with a net on the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal (R) and his nephew Joseph Marshal (L) fish for salmon with a net on the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal (R) and his nephew Joseph Marshal (L) fish for salmon with a net on the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Ernie Marshal cleans and cuts the salmon he caught on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal cleans and cuts the salmon he caught on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Ernie Marshal cleans and cuts the salmon he caught on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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A weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, stretches across the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, stretches across the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

A weir, a non-lethal way to catch fish and run by the Hoopa Valley tribe, stretches across the Trinity River.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Eve Bibancos, a Hoopa Valley tribal member, smiles after receiving a free fish caught by the tribe.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Eve Bibancos, a Hoopa Valley tribal member, smiles after receiving a free fish caught by the tribe.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Eve Bibancos, a Hoopa Valley tribal member, smiles after receiving a free fish caught by the tribe.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Two deer skins are hung to dry in front of Virgil Pole's house. "We could use the deer skins to make a drum or use it for a girl's regalia in the brush dance," said Mykle Pole, age 14.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Two deer skins are hung to dry in front of Virgil Pole's house. "We could use the deer skins to make a drum or use it for a girl's regalia in the brush dance," said Mykle Pole, age 14. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Two deer skins are hung to dry in front of Virgil Pole's house. "We could use the deer skins to make a drum or use it for a girl's regalia in the brush dance," said Mykle Pole, age 14. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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The Trinity River and its historical high water mark is seen on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

The Trinity River and its historical high water mark is seen on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

The Trinity River and its historical high water mark is seen on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.  REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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