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Pictures | Wed Sep 15, 2010 | 11:50am EDT

Ancient finds

<p>An aerial view of the Spider Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert, Peru, September 7, 2010. These ancient geoglyphs, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, are a series of enigmatic shapes and lines and stylized figures of animals etched in the desert some 2,000 years ago by the Nazca culture. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil </p>

An aerial view of the Spider Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert, Peru, September 7, 2010. These ancient geoglyphs, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, are a series of enigmatic shapes and lines and stylized figures of animals etched in the desert...more

An aerial view of the Spider Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert, Peru, September 7, 2010. These ancient geoglyphs, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, are a series of enigmatic shapes and lines and stylized figures of animals etched in the desert some 2,000 years ago by the Nazca culture. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil

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<p>Francis Grew, senior archaeology curator at the Museum of London, poses for a photo with the bones of a North Atlantic right whale which were found in the river Thames at Greenwich, at the Museum of London Docklands, September 9, 2010. A huge skeleton of a whale, thought to have been butchered for its precious meat, bone and oils 300 years ago, has been discovered by archaeologists on the banks of London's River Thames. REUTERS/Andrew Winning </p>

Francis Grew, senior archaeology curator at the Museum of London, poses for a photo with the bones of a North Atlantic right whale which were found in the river Thames at Greenwich, at the Museum of London Docklands, September 9, 2010. A huge...more

Francis Grew, senior archaeology curator at the Museum of London, poses for a photo with the bones of a North Atlantic right whale which were found in the river Thames at Greenwich, at the Museum of London Docklands, September 9, 2010. A huge skeleton of a whale, thought to have been butchered for its precious meat, bone and oils 300 years ago, has been discovered by archaeologists on the banks of London's River Thames. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>Myrtis, a reconstructed sculpture of an ancient Athenian girl who died at age 11 in the Athens plague of 430 B.C. sits on display inside the National Archaeological Museum in Athens September 15, 2010. According to the museum, her skull, along with some 150 others, was discovered in very good condition, prompting Athens University Orthodontics professor Manolis Papagrigorakis and other scientists to create a facial reconstruction of the girl. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis </p>

Myrtis, a reconstructed sculpture of an ancient Athenian girl who died at age 11 in the Athens plague of 430 B.C. sits on display inside the National Archaeological Museum in Athens September 15, 2010. According to the museum, her skull, along with...more

Myrtis, a reconstructed sculpture of an ancient Athenian girl who died at age 11 in the Athens plague of 430 B.C. sits on display inside the National Archaeological Museum in Athens September 15, 2010. According to the museum, her skull, along with some 150 others, was discovered in very good condition, prompting Athens University Orthodontics professor Manolis Papagrigorakis and other scientists to create a facial reconstruction of the girl. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis

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<p>The Cyrus Cylinder, a 539-530 B.C. artefact, is seen on display at the National Museum of Iran in Tehran September 12, 2010. Iran has received an ancient Persian treasure from the British Museum after a months-long dispute over its loan to the Islamic Republic, state media reported on Friday. Cyrus is regarded as one of ancient Persia's greatest historical figures and is credited as the author of a decree inscribed on the cylinder, which some have described as the first charter of human rights. REUTERS/Caren Firouz</p>

The Cyrus Cylinder, a 539-530 B.C. artefact, is seen on display at the National Museum of Iran in Tehran September 12, 2010. Iran has received an ancient Persian treasure from the British Museum after a months-long dispute over its loan to the...more

The Cyrus Cylinder, a 539-530 B.C. artefact, is seen on display at the National Museum of Iran in Tehran September 12, 2010. Iran has received an ancient Persian treasure from the British Museum after a months-long dispute over its loan to the Islamic Republic, state media reported on Friday. Cyrus is regarded as one of ancient Persia's greatest historical figures and is credited as the author of a decree inscribed on the cylinder, which some have described as the first charter of human rights. REUTERS/Caren Firouz

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<p>Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer picks up a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used by ancestors of the Vikings to hunt reindeer in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. Climate change is exposing reindeer hunting gear used by the Vikings' ancestors faster than archaeologists can collect it from ice thawing in northern Europe's highest mountains. REUTERS/Alister Doyle </p>

Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer picks up a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used by ancestors of the Vikings to hunt reindeer in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. Climate change is exposing reindeer...more

Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer picks up a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used by ancestors of the Vikings to hunt reindeer in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. Climate change is exposing reindeer hunting gear used by the Vikings' ancestors faster than archaeologists can collect it from ice thawing in northern Europe's highest mountains. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

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<p>Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010.The headless statue of a Sumerian king and more than 500 other artefacts looted from Iraq's museum and archaeological sites during the 2003 U.S.-led invasion have been returned home, officials said. REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen </p>

Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010.The headless statue of a Sumerian king and more than 500 other artefacts looted from Iraq's museum and archaeological sites during the 2003...more

Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010.The headless statue of a Sumerian king and more than 500 other artefacts looted from Iraq's museum and archaeological sites during the 2003 U.S.-led invasion have been returned home, officials said. REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen

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<p>France's President Nicolas Sarkozy (R) looks at cave paintings as he visits the Lascaux caves for the 70th anniversary of their discovery in Montignac, South-Western France, September 12, 2010. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer </p>

France's President Nicolas Sarkozy (R) looks at cave paintings as he visits the Lascaux caves for the 70th anniversary of their discovery in Montignac, South-Western France, September 12, 2010. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer

France's President Nicolas Sarkozy (R) looks at cave paintings as he visits the Lascaux caves for the 70th anniversary of their discovery in Montignac, South-Western France, September 12, 2010. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer

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<p>Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010.  REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen </p>

Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010. REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen

Artefacts are displayed at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs headquarters in Baghdad September 7, 2010. REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen

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<p>Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer shows off a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used in reindeer hunts by ancestors of the Vikings in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. REUTERS/Alister Doyle </p>

Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer shows off a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used in reindeer hunts by ancestors of the Vikings in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian archaeologist Elling Utvik Wammer shows off a stick believed to be about 1,500 years old and used in reindeer hunts by ancestors of the Vikings in the Jotunheimen mountains of Norway September 9, 2010. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

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<p>An aerial view of the Astronaut Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert September 7, 2010. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil </p>

An aerial view of the Astronaut Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert September 7, 2010. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil

An aerial view of the Astronaut Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert September 7, 2010. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil

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