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Pictures | Mon Oct 8, 2012 | 10:15am EDT

"Baby box" for unwanted infants

<p>A "baby box" (L) is seen at Joosarang church as preacher Jeong Young-ran and two children, who were abandoned at the church years earlier and have been raised there ever since, go out for a walk in Seoul September 20, 2012. Pastor Lee Jong-rak, who runs the "baby box" at the church where mothers can leave unwanted infants, has seen a sharp increase in the number of newborns being left there because, the pastor says, of a new law aimed protecting the rights of children. South Korea is trying to shed a reputation of being a source of babies for adoption by people abroad. It is encouraging domestic adoption and tightening up the process of a child's transfer from birth mother to adoptive parents.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A "baby box" (L) is seen at Joosarang church as preacher Jeong Young-ran and two children, who were abandoned at the church years earlier and have been raised there ever since, go out for a walk in Seoul September 20, 2012. Pastor Lee Jong-rak, who...more

A "baby box" (L) is seen at Joosarang church as preacher Jeong Young-ran and two children, who were abandoned at the church years earlier and have been raised there ever since, go out for a walk in Seoul September 20, 2012. Pastor Lee Jong-rak, who runs the "baby box" at the church where mothers can leave unwanted infants, has seen a sharp increase in the number of newborns being left there because, the pastor says, of a new law aimed protecting the rights of children. South Korea is trying to shed a reputation of being a source of babies for adoption by people abroad. It is encouraging domestic adoption and tightening up the process of a child's transfer from birth mother to adoptive parents. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak adjusts the blanket around an abandoned two-week-old baby boy in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak adjusts the blanket around an abandoned two-week-old baby boy in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak adjusts the blanket around an abandoned two-week-old baby boy in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak carries a baby, abandoned a day earlier at a "baby box" at his Joosarang church, to hand it over to ward officials as portraits of other abandoned children raised and adopted by him are seen on a wall of the church in Seoul September 20, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak carries a baby, abandoned a day earlier at a "baby box" at his Joosarang church, to hand it over to ward officials as portraits of other abandoned children raised and adopted by him are seen on a wall of the church in...more

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak carries a baby, abandoned a day earlier at a "baby box" at his Joosarang church, to hand it over to ward officials as portraits of other abandoned children raised and adopted by him are seen on a wall of the church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak holds an abandoned baby boy as he prays at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012.    REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak holds an abandoned baby boy as he prays at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korean pastor Lee Jong-rak holds an abandoned baby boy as he prays at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>A policeman (R) talks on a phone as preacher Jeong Young-ran looks on after a mother abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A policeman (R) talks on a phone as preacher Jeong Young-ran looks on after a mother abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A policeman (R) talks on a phone as preacher Jeong Young-ran looks on after a mother abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>A letter from a mother who abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church is seen inside an office at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A letter from a mother who abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church is seen inside an office at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A letter from a mother who abandoned her baby at a "baby box" at Joosarang church is seen inside an office at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>A police officer collects DNA samples from two abandoned babies after the babies were left at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012.   . REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A police officer collects DNA samples from two abandoned babies after the babies were left at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. . REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A police officer collects DNA samples from two abandoned babies after the babies were left at a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. . REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Ward officials, who did not want to be identified, hold abandoned babies as they head to a child advocacy centre after the babies had undergone checkups at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012.  REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Ward officials, who did not want to be identified, hold abandoned babies as they head to a child advocacy centre after the babies had undergone checkups at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Ward officials, who did not want to be identified, hold abandoned babies as they head to a child advocacy centre after the babies had undergone checkups at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>A ward official takes care of a baby who was abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church, before the baby's medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A ward official takes care of a baby who was abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church, before the baby's medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A ward official takes care of a baby who was abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church, before the baby's medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>An abandoned baby is seen reflected in a closet after it was found in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 19, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

An abandoned baby is seen reflected in a closet after it was found in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

An abandoned baby is seen reflected in a closet after it was found in a "baby box" at Joosarang church in Seoul September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Pastor Lee Jong-rak feeds his 25-year-old son Lee Eun-man, who has cerebral palsy, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Pastor Lee Jong-rak feeds his 25-year-old son Lee Eun-man, who has cerebral palsy, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Pastor Lee Jong-rak feeds his 25-year-old son Lee Eun-man, who has cerebral palsy, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012.    REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Lee On-u (L), 6, and Lee Jin-ri, 5, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church and has been there raised since.  REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Lee On-u (L), 6, and Lee Jin-ri, 5, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church and has been there raised since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Lee On-u (L), 6, and Lee Jin-ri, 5, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church and has been there raised since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Choi Seol, 19, is seen at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Choi, a disabled person, was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Choi Seol, 19, is seen at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Choi, a disabled person, was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Choi Seol, 19, is seen at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Choi, a disabled person, was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Lee Jin-ri (front), 5, and Choi Seol, 19, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church years earlier and have been raised since then at the church.    REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Lee Jin-ri (front), 5, and Choi Seol, 19, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church years earlier and have been raised since then at the church. REUTERS/Kim...more

Lee Jin-ri (front), 5, and Choi Seol, 19, play at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. The two disabled children had been abandoned at a "baby box" at the church years earlier and have been raised since then at the church. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Pastor Lee Jong-rak plays with Lee On-u, 6, a disabled child who was abandoned, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012.   REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Pastor Lee Jong-rak plays with Lee On-u, 6, a disabled child who was abandoned, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Pastor Lee Jong-rak plays with Lee On-u, 6, a disabled child who was abandoned, at the Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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<p>Lee Eun-hye, 7, prays during a worship session at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Lee was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since.    REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji</p>

Lee Eun-hye, 7, prays during a worship session at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Lee was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Lee Eun-hye, 7, prays during a worship session at Joosarang church in Seoul September 20, 2012. Lee was abandoned at the church and has been raised there since. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

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