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Black armed protesters march in Kentucky demanding justice for Breonna Taylor

John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson, center, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, leads a march during an armed rally in Louisville, Kentucky, July 25, 2020. A group of heavily armed Black protesters marched through Louisville, Kentucky demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, a Black woman killed in March by police officers who burst into her apartment.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson, center, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, leads a march during an armed rally in Louisville, Kentucky, July 25, 2020. A group of heavily armed Black protesters marched through Louisville, Kentucky...more

John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson, center, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, leads a march during an armed rally in Louisville, Kentucky, July 25, 2020. A group of heavily armed Black protesters marched through Louisville, Kentucky demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, a Black woman killed in March by police officers who burst into her apartment. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Scores of the demonstrators, carrying semi-automatic rifles and shotguns and clad in black paramilitary gear, walked in formation to a fenced off intersection where they were separated by police from a smaller group of armed counter-protesters.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Scores of the demonstrators, carrying semi-automatic rifles and shotguns and clad in black paramilitary gear, walked in formation to a fenced off intersection where they were separated by police from a smaller group of armed...more

Scores of the demonstrators, carrying semi-automatic rifles and shotguns and clad in black paramilitary gear, walked in formation to a fenced off intersection where they were separated by police from a smaller group of armed counter-protesters. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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The Black militia dubbed NFAC want justice for Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician who died in a hail of gunfire when drug investigators bearing a "no-knock" warrant entered her Louisville home four months ago. One police officer involved in the raid was fired by the city's police department in June. Two other officers have been placed on administrative reassignment. No criminal charges have been filed against any of the three.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

The Black militia dubbed NFAC want justice for Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician who died in a hail of gunfire when drug investigators bearing a "no-knock" warrant entered her Louisville home four months ago. One police officer...more

The Black militia dubbed NFAC want justice for Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician who died in a hail of gunfire when drug investigators bearing a "no-knock" warrant entered her Louisville home four months ago. One police officer involved in the raid was fired by the city's police department in June. Two other officers have been placed on administrative reassignment. No criminal charges have been filed against any of the three. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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The leader of the NFAC group, John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson (pictured), called on officials to speed up the investigation into her death and to be more transparent. "If you don't tell us nothing we going to think you ain't doing nothing," Johnson said in a speech, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

The leader of the NFAC group, John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson (pictured), called on officials to speed up the investigation into her death and to be more transparent. "If you don't tell us nothing we going to think you ain't doing nothing," Johnson...more

The leader of the NFAC group, John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson (pictured), called on officials to speed up the investigation into her death and to be more transparent. "If you don't tell us nothing we going to think you ain't doing nothing," Johnson said in a speech, according to the Louisville Courier Journal. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of the Kentucky Three Percenters Militia line up as members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of the Kentucky Three Percenters Militia line up as members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of the Kentucky Three Percenters Militia line up as members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Taylor's death, which returned to prominence following the May 25 suffocation in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, has become a rallying cry in nationwide protests against police brutality and racial bias in the U.S. criminal justice system.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Taylor's death, which returned to prominence following the May 25 suffocation in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, has become a rallying cry in nationwide protests against police brutality and racial bias in the U.S. criminal justice...more

Taylor's death, which returned to prominence following the May 25 suffocation in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, has become a rallying cry in nationwide protests against police brutality and racial bias in the U.S. criminal justice system. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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The NFAC first drew attention on July 4 when they rallied in Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta to demand the removal of the giant Confederate rock carving at the site that civil rights activists consider a monument to racism.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

The NFAC first drew attention on July 4 when they rallied in Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta to demand the removal of the giant Confederate rock carving at the site that civil rights activists consider a monument to racism. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

The NFAC first drew attention on July 4 when they rallied in Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta to demand the removal of the giant Confederate rock carving at the site that civil rights activists consider a monument to racism. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Member of an all-Black militia march through an abandoned neighborhood in West Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Member of an all-Black militia march through an abandoned neighborhood in West Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Member of an all-Black militia march through an abandoned neighborhood in West Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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In Louisville, three members of the group were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries when a weapon was accidentally discharged, police said.

REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

In Louisville, three members of the group were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries when a weapon was accidentally discharged, police said. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

In Louisville, three members of the group were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries when a weapon was accidentally discharged, police said. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A piece of medical equipment lies on the ground as police officers investigate a shooting that happened during the rally, in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A piece of medical equipment lies on the ground as police officers investigate a shooting that happened during the rally, in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A piece of medical equipment lies on the ground as police officers investigate a shooting that happened during the rally, in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, prepares to lead his followers on a march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, prepares to lead his followers on a march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, prepares to lead his followers on a march in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members and supporters of an all-black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally outside Central High School in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC watches the crowd during an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC watches the crowd during an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC watches the crowd during an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Grand Master Jay, the leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, inspects the semi-automatic rifle of a member  in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, the leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, inspects the semi-automatic rifle of a member in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, the leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, inspects the semi-automatic rifle of a member in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A member of an all-Black militia group called NFAC walks in the street. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC hold an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC stand at the scene of an accidental shooting prior to an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC stand at the scene of an accidental shooting prior to an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-Black militia group called NFAC stand at the scene of an accidental shooting prior to an armed rally in Louisville. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, speaks with his followers before the armed rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, speaks with his followers before the armed rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Grand Master Jay, leader of an all-Black militia group called NFAC, speaks with his followers before the armed rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A supporter of an all-black militia group called NFAC walks during a rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A supporter of an all-black militia group called NFAC walks during a rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A supporter of an all-black militia group called NFAC walks during a rally. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of an all-black militia group called NFAC prepare for a march. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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