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Pictures | Tue Sep 4, 2018 | 4:20pm EDT

Climate change threatens Bolivian indigenous culture

A boat and a bicycle are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017.  REUTERS/David Mercado

A boat and a bicycle are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A boat and a bicycle are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos fisherman Abdon Choque brings duck eggs to a relative who lives on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos fisherman Abdon Choque brings duck eggs to a relative who lives on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos fisherman Abdon Choque brings duck eggs to a relative who lives on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos men are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men are seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Fisherman Abdon Choque looks for duck eggs on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Fisherman Abdon Choque looks for duck eggs on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Fisherman Abdon Choque looks for duck eggs on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Duck eggs are seen on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Duck eggs are seen on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Duck eggs are seen on the Desaguadero river near the lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos children pose for a photography in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018.  REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos children pose for a photography in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos children pose for a photography in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos women and children are seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos women and children are seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos women and children are seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Ducks are seen on the Desaguadero river near lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Ducks are seen on the Desaguadero river near lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Ducks are seen on the Desaguadero river near lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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An Urus Muratos man talks about the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos man talks about the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos man talks about the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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An Urus Muratos man walks on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos man walks on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos man walks on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A bird is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

A bird is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

A bird is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Girls play in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Girls play in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado

Girls play in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A view of Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, May 4, 2018. For thousands of years, the Uru people of western Bolivia have existed around Lake Poopo (poh-oh-POH), living on floating reed islands and along the banks of the shore, fishing for survival. Now, after years of drought have left parched earth where the massive lake used to be, the Uru people are facing an end to their way of life. REUTERS/David Mercado

A view of Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, May 4, 2018. For thousands of years, the Uru people of western Bolivia have existed around Lake Poopo (poh-oh-POH), living on...more

A view of Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, May 4, 2018. For thousands of years, the Uru people of western Bolivia have existed around Lake Poopo (poh-oh-POH), living on floating reed islands and along the banks of the shore, fishing for survival. Now, after years of drought have left parched earth where the massive lake used to be, the Uru people are facing an end to their way of life. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A silhouette of an Urus Muratos man is seen near Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. According to the Oruro Technical University, the temperature of the Bolivian highlands has increased just enough to compound the effects of the drought. Scientists said that when it does rain, the increased temperature makes the water evaporate much faster than it used to, impeding any meaningful accumulation. The sustained drought caused millions of fish to die, along with numerous birds and other wildlife. REUTERS/David Mercado

A silhouette of an Urus Muratos man is seen near Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. According to the Oruro Technical University, the temperature of the Bolivian...more

A silhouette of an Urus Muratos man is seen near Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, April 4, 2018. According to the Oruro Technical University, the temperature of the Bolivian highlands has increased just enough to compound the effects of the drought. Scientists said that when it does rain, the increased temperature makes the water evaporate much faster than it used to, impeding any meaningful accumulation. The sustained drought caused millions of fish to die, along with numerous birds and other wildlife. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Over the past few years, many of the Uru men left their traditional villages to find work, primarily in mining or bricklaying.

In 2010, approximately 100-200 tribal members lived in four communities around the lake. Today, only dozens live year-round in each. Those left behind were primarily women, children and the elderly, who remember when the disappearance of the lake was unimaginable. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Over the past few years, many of the Uru men left their traditional...more

Urus Muratos men participate in an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Over the past few years, many of the Uru men left their traditional villages to find work, primarily in mining or bricklaying. In 2010, approximately 100-200 tribal members lived in four communities around the lake. Today, only dozens live year-round in each. Those left behind were primarily women, children and the elderly, who remember when the disappearance of the lake was unimaginable. REUTERS/David Mercado
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An Urus Muratos man pushes a motorcycle of a companion on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Now, the Uru tribal members are trying their hand at farming and selling crafts, as they search for a sustainable way to keep their culture alive, in hopes that the lake will return. They scan the lake for water mirrors, which they take as a miraculous sign that the lake will return. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos man pushes a motorcycle of a companion on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Now, the Uru tribal members are trying their hand at farming and selling crafts, as they...more

An Urus Muratos man pushes a motorcycle of a companion on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Now, the Uru tribal members are trying their hand at farming and selling crafts, as they search for a sustainable way to keep their culture alive, in hopes that the lake will return. They scan the lake for water mirrors, which they take as a miraculous sign that the lake will return. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A view of dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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An Urus Muratos woman is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos woman is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

An Urus Muratos woman is seen in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos women cook in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos women cook in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos women cook in Punaca on the shores of the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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A carcase of a boat is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A carcase of a boat is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

A carcase of a boat is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, December 16, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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Urus Muratos men walk on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change to make an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water), in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men walk on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change to make an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water), in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado

Urus Muratos men walk on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change to make an offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water), in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
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