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Pictures | Mon Dec 7, 2009 | 2:20pm EST

Climate spotlight: Deforestation

<p>A view of burned trees in a peatland area of the Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. An Indonesia-based study is showing carbon-rich tropical peatlands trap more greenhouse gases than first thought, driving up their potential value on the carbon market and strengthening the case for their protection.. REUTERS/Beawiharta </p>

A view of burned trees in a peatland area of the Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. An Indonesia-based study is showing carbon-rich tropical peatlands trap more greenhouse gases than first thought,...more

A view of burned trees in a peatland area of the Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. An Indonesia-based study is showing carbon-rich tropical peatlands trap more greenhouse gases than first thought, driving up their potential value on the carbon market and strengthening the case for their protection.. REUTERS/Beawiharta

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<p>A Haitian boy carries wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of La Internacional in Haiti, April 27, 2009. Haiti is denuded of forest because of logging and the burning by villagers of wood and charcoal for fuel. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz </p>

A Haitian boy carries wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of La Internacional in Haiti, April 27, 2009. Haiti is denuded of forest because of logging and the burning by villagers of wood and charcoal for fuel....more

A Haitian boy carries wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of La Internacional in Haiti, April 27, 2009. Haiti is denuded of forest because of logging and the burning by villagers of wood and charcoal for fuel. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

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<p>Greenpeace activists stage a protest against deforestation near a Brazil nut tree in the Amazon rainforest in the Brazil town of Claudia, Mato Grosso State August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos</p>

Greenpeace activists stage a protest against deforestation near a Brazil nut tree in the Amazon rainforest in the Brazil town of Claudia, Mato Grosso State August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

Greenpeace activists stage a protest against deforestation near a Brazil nut tree in the Amazon rainforest in the Brazil town of Claudia, Mato Grosso State August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

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<p>Children from the Batek tribe play in their house in a village next to the entrance of Kuala Koh National Park in the northeastern Peninsular Malaysia state of Kelantan October 21, 2009. For thousands of years, Malaysia's nomadic Batek tribe have roamed the country's ancient tropical rainforests, completely at one with their natural habitat. But now the Batek's traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle is under severe threat from deforestation and development, and mainland Malaysia's last nomadic community may soon have no choice but to abandon their traditional life and settle down. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim </p>

Children from the Batek tribe play in their house in a village next to the entrance of Kuala Koh National Park in the northeastern Peninsular Malaysia state of Kelantan October 21, 2009. For thousands of years, Malaysia's nomadic Batek tribe have...more

Children from the Batek tribe play in their house in a village next to the entrance of Kuala Koh National Park in the northeastern Peninsular Malaysia state of Kelantan October 21, 2009. For thousands of years, Malaysia's nomadic Batek tribe have roamed the country's ancient tropical rainforests, completely at one with their natural habitat. But now the Batek's traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle is under severe threat from deforestation and development, and mainland Malaysia's last nomadic community may soon have no choice but to abandon their traditional life and settle down. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim

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<p>A view of a church made of wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of Palo Colorado in the Dominican Republic, April 27, 2009.  REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz </p>

A view of a church made of wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of Palo Colorado in the Dominican Republic, April 27, 2009. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

A view of a church made of wood in the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, at the side of Palo Colorado in the Dominican Republic, April 27, 2009. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

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<p>An aerial view of a sawmill that processes logs from the Amazon rainforest that is being inspected by Para state policemen and environmental inspectors in Tailandia, 180 km (112 miles) south of Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, February 13, 2008. In what the Para state government is calling one of the biggest operations against illegal logging ever in the Amazon, 120 policemen and inspectors are carrying out raids on sawmills and logging camps where they have already confiscated more than 10,000 cubic meters (353,143 cubic feet) of tree trunks and wood cut from native species, more than enough to load onto some 500 tractor trailers. REUTERS/Paulo Santos </p>

An aerial view of a sawmill that processes logs from the Amazon rainforest that is being inspected by Para state policemen and environmental inspectors in Tailandia, 180 km (112 miles) south of Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, February 13,...more

An aerial view of a sawmill that processes logs from the Amazon rainforest that is being inspected by Para state policemen and environmental inspectors in Tailandia, 180 km (112 miles) south of Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, February 13, 2008. In what the Para state government is calling one of the biggest operations against illegal logging ever in the Amazon, 120 policemen and inspectors are carrying out raids on sawmills and logging camps where they have already confiscated more than 10,000 cubic meters (353,143 cubic feet) of tree trunks and wood cut from native species, more than enough to load onto some 500 tractor trailers. REUTERS/Paulo Santos

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<p>Flood victims scramble for handouts of food in Solo, in the central Java province December 30, 2007. Hundreds of Indonesians camped in government offices on Sunday after their homes were destroyed in landslides on Java island, as rescuers struggled to dig through thick mud in their search for dozens of missing people. Landslides and floods are frequent in Indonesia, where tropical downpours can quickly soak hillsides and years of deforestation often mean there is little vegetation to hold the soil. REUTERS/Andry Prasetyo </p>

Flood victims scramble for handouts of food in Solo, in the central Java province December 30, 2007. Hundreds of Indonesians camped in government offices on Sunday after their homes were destroyed in landslides on Java island, as rescuers struggled...more

Flood victims scramble for handouts of food in Solo, in the central Java province December 30, 2007. Hundreds of Indonesians camped in government offices on Sunday after their homes were destroyed in landslides on Java island, as rescuers struggled to dig through thick mud in their search for dozens of missing people. Landslides and floods are frequent in Indonesia, where tropical downpours can quickly soak hillsides and years of deforestation often mean there is little vegetation to hold the soil. REUTERS/Andry Prasetyo

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<p>A village collects firewood at a pine forest at Bromo Tengger's national park in Lumajang, Indonesia's East Java province September 8, 2009.  REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas </p>

A village collects firewood at a pine forest at Bromo Tengger's national park in Lumajang, Indonesia's East Java province September 8, 2009. REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas

A village collects firewood at a pine forest at Bromo Tengger's national park in Lumajang, Indonesia's East Java province September 8, 2009. REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas

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<p>Greenpeace activists display a giant banner during their protest calling on U.S President Barack Obama, who arrives in Asia for his first visit, to stop deforestation of Indonesia's threatened rainforests in the heart of Sumatra's Riau province November 12, 2009. REUTERS/Handout/Greenpeace/John Novis</p>

Greenpeace activists display a giant banner during their protest calling on U.S President Barack Obama, who arrives in Asia for his first visit, to stop deforestation of Indonesia's threatened rainforests in the heart of Sumatra's Riau province...more

Greenpeace activists display a giant banner during their protest calling on U.S President Barack Obama, who arrives in Asia for his first visit, to stop deforestation of Indonesia's threatened rainforests in the heart of Sumatra's Riau province November 12, 2009. REUTERS/Handout/Greenpeace/John Novis

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<p>Haze blankets a damaged rainforest in Sampit regency of the Indonesia's central Kalimantan province October 3, 2007.  REUTERS/Hardi Baktiantoro </p>

Haze blankets a damaged rainforest in Sampit regency of the Indonesia's central Kalimantan province October 3, 2007. REUTERS/Hardi Baktiantoro

Haze blankets a damaged rainforest in Sampit regency of the Indonesia's central Kalimantan province October 3, 2007. REUTERS/Hardi Baktiantoro

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<p>A Kosovo Albanian youth piles up logs of firewood as he prepares for winter in Balic, some 45 km (30 miles) from Kosovo's capital Pristina, October 26, 2008. REUTERS/Hazir Reka </p>

A Kosovo Albanian youth piles up logs of firewood as he prepares for winter in Balic, some 45 km (30 miles) from Kosovo's capital Pristina, October 26, 2008. REUTERS/Hazir Reka

A Kosovo Albanian youth piles up logs of firewood as he prepares for winter in Balic, some 45 km (30 miles) from Kosovo's capital Pristina, October 26, 2008. REUTERS/Hazir Reka

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<p>Children play in a peatland river in the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, in Riau province November 11, 2009. Home to about 10 percent of the world's rainforests, deforestation in Indonesia occurred at an average rate of 1.08 million hectares a year between 2000 and 2005, according to the Ministry of Forestry. REUTERS/Beawiharta </p>

Children play in a peatland river in the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, in Riau province November 11, 2009. Home to about 10 percent of the world's rainforests, deforestation in Indonesia occurred at an average...more

Children play in a peatland river in the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, in Riau province November 11, 2009. Home to about 10 percent of the world's rainforests, deforestation in Indonesia occurred at an average rate of 1.08 million hectares a year between 2000 and 2005, according to the Ministry of Forestry. REUTERS/Beawiharta

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<p>Children play with snow after heavy hailstorm hit a deforested hillside in Gikingi Village in Nyahururu town, Kenya, September 3, 2008. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna </p>

Children play with snow after heavy hailstorm hit a deforested hillside in Gikingi Village in Nyahururu town, Kenya, September 3, 2008. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna

Children play with snow after heavy hailstorm hit a deforested hillside in Gikingi Village in Nyahururu town, Kenya, September 3, 2008. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna

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<p>Wildebeests (connochaetes taurinus) cross the Mara river during a migration in Masaai Mara game reserve, 270 km (165 miles) southwest of capital Nairobi, July 28, 2009. The annual zebra and wildebeest migration is expected to attract a large number of tourists but there are fears on the dropping water levels due to the deforestation in the Mau forest complex; the largest indigenous forest in East Africa. The migration is the world's greatest wildlife spectacle taking place between the open plains of the Serengeti and the Masaai Mara as the animals migrate to greener pastures as the seasons change and the circle of life and death continues. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya </p>

Wildebeests (connochaetes taurinus) cross the Mara river during a migration in Masaai Mara game reserve, 270 km (165 miles) southwest of capital Nairobi, July 28, 2009. The annual zebra and wildebeest migration is expected to attract a large number...more

Wildebeests (connochaetes taurinus) cross the Mara river during a migration in Masaai Mara game reserve, 270 km (165 miles) southwest of capital Nairobi, July 28, 2009. The annual zebra and wildebeest migration is expected to attract a large number of tourists but there are fears on the dropping water levels due to the deforestation in the Mau forest complex; the largest indigenous forest in East Africa. The migration is the world's greatest wildlife spectacle taking place between the open plains of the Serengeti and the Masaai Mara as the animals migrate to greener pastures as the seasons change and the circle of life and death continues. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

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<p>A worker carts charcoal made from native Amazon trees past some of the nearly 1,200 ovens that produce the charcoal for use in iron smelters and for home use, just outside the town of Ulianopolis in Para state July 5, 2007. The cutting of trees for the charcoal industry is one of the main causes of the destruction of the world's largest rainforest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos </p>

A worker carts charcoal made from native Amazon trees past some of the nearly 1,200 ovens that produce the charcoal for use in iron smelters and for home use, just outside the town of Ulianopolis in Para state July 5, 2007. The cutting of trees for...more

A worker carts charcoal made from native Amazon trees past some of the nearly 1,200 ovens that produce the charcoal for use in iron smelters and for home use, just outside the town of Ulianopolis in Para state July 5, 2007. The cutting of trees for the charcoal industry is one of the main causes of the destruction of the world's largest rainforest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos

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<p>An environmental activist climbs up a tree in a camp of protestors demonstrating against the clearing of a huge wood area for a new runway for the airport in Frankfurt, January 20, 2009. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach</p>

An environmental activist climbs up a tree in a camp of protestors demonstrating against the clearing of a huge wood area for a new runway for the airport in Frankfurt, January 20, 2009. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

An environmental activist climbs up a tree in a camp of protestors demonstrating against the clearing of a huge wood area for a new runway for the airport in Frankfurt, January 20, 2009. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

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<p>Virgin Amazon rain forest surrounds patches of deforested land prepared for the planting of soybeans, in this aerial photo taken over Mato Grosso state in western Brazil, February 25, 2008. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker </p>

Virgin Amazon rain forest surrounds patches of deforested land prepared for the planting of soybeans, in this aerial photo taken over Mato Grosso state in western Brazil, February 25, 2008. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker

Virgin Amazon rain forest surrounds patches of deforested land prepared for the planting of soybeans, in this aerial photo taken over Mato Grosso state in western Brazil, February 25, 2008. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker

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<p>An aerial view shows a single tree seen on land that was previously jungle in Mato Grosso state, one of the Brazilian states suffering from deforestation, August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos </p>

An aerial view shows a single tree seen on land that was previously jungle in Mato Grosso state, one of the Brazilian states suffering from deforestation, August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

An aerial view shows a single tree seen on land that was previously jungle in Mato Grosso state, one of the Brazilian states suffering from deforestation, August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

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<p>A burnt tree stands on a clearing of land for a palm oil plantation near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province November 11, 2009.  REUTERS/Beawiharta</p>

A burnt tree stands on a clearing of land for a palm oil plantation near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province November 11, 2009. REUTERS/Beawiharta

A burnt tree stands on a clearing of land for a palm oil plantation near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province November 11, 2009. REUTERS/Beawiharta

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<p>A sapling grows on a dead tree in a peatland area of the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. REUTERS/Beawiharta </p>

A sapling grows on a dead tree in a peatland area of the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. REUTERS/Beawiharta

A sapling grows on a dead tree in a peatland area of the Kerumutan protected forest near Teluk Meranti village in Pelalawan, Indonesia's Riau province, November 11, 2009. REUTERS/Beawiharta

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