Edition:
United States
Pictures | Thu Jan 25, 2018 | 2:55pm EST

Cloned creatures

Chinese scientists have cloned monkeys using the same technique that produced Dolly the sheep two decades ago, breaking a technical barrier that could open the door to copying humans. Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, two identical long-tailed macaques, seen here January 20, 2018, were born eight and six weeks ago, making them the first primates -- the order of mammals that includes monkeys, apes and humans -- to be cloned from a non-embryonic cell.

China Daily via REUTERS

Chinese scientists have cloned monkeys using the same technique that produced Dolly the sheep two decades ago, breaking a technical barrier that could open the door to copying humans. Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, two identical long-tailed macaques, seen...more

Chinese scientists have cloned monkeys using the same technique that produced Dolly the sheep two decades ago, breaking a technical barrier that could open the door to copying humans. Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, two identical long-tailed macaques, seen here January 20, 2018, were born eight and six weeks ago, making them the first primates -- the order of mammals that includes monkeys, apes and humans -- to be cloned from a non-embryonic cell. China Daily via REUTERS
Close
1 / 19
The world's first clone of an adult animal, Dolly the sheep, bleats during a photocall at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland January 4, 2002. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell

The world's first clone of an adult animal, Dolly the sheep, bleats during a photocall at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland January 4, 2002. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell

The world's first clone of an adult animal, Dolly the sheep, bleats during a photocall at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland January 4, 2002. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell
Close
2 / 19
Cloned piglets from a single donor pig rest at a pig farm in Shenzhen, China August 23, 2010. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Cloned piglets from a single donor pig rest at a pig farm in Shenzhen, China August 23, 2010. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Cloned piglets from a single donor pig rest at a pig farm in Shenzhen, China August 23, 2010. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Close
3 / 19
Bernann McKinney from the U.S. holds one of five cloned puppies, the offspring of her late bull terrier Booger, upon her first meeting with them at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals in Seoul August 5, 2008. RNL Bio, a South Korean company dedicated to the development of stem cell therapeutics and the commercialization of dog cloning technology, successfully cloned McKinney's pet dog and commenced worldwide dog cloning services. Five clones, named Booger Bernann, Booger Ra, Booger Lee, Booger Hong and Booger Park, were born from two surrogate mother dogs on July 28, 2008. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

Bernann McKinney from the U.S. holds one of five cloned puppies, the offspring of her late bull terrier Booger, upon her first meeting with them at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals in Seoul August 5, 2008. RNL Bio, a South Korean...more

Bernann McKinney from the U.S. holds one of five cloned puppies, the offspring of her late bull terrier Booger, upon her first meeting with them at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals in Seoul August 5, 2008. RNL Bio, a South Korean company dedicated to the development of stem cell therapeutics and the commercialization of dog cloning technology, successfully cloned McKinney's pet dog and commenced worldwide dog cloning services. Five clones, named Booger Bernann, Booger Ra, Booger Lee, Booger Hong and Booger Park, were born from two surrogate mother dogs on July 28, 2008. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak
Close
4 / 19
Stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk (R) and Gyeonggi province governor Kim Moon-su (2nd R) hold a cloned coyote during a donation ceremony at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. Hwang donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

Stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk (R) and Gyeonggi province governor Kim Moon-su (2nd R) hold a cloned coyote during a donation ceremony at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. Hwang donated eight coyotes that he...more

Stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk (R) and Gyeonggi province governor Kim Moon-su (2nd R) hold a cloned coyote during a donation ceremony at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. Hwang donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak
Close
5 / 19
Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion, a 48-day-old cloned foal, runs in a field outside Cremona, Italy, April 14, 2005. Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion was born February 25, 2005 from the genes of castrated endurance champion Pieraz, an Arab stallion. The genetics companies LTR-CIZ and Cryzootech say that it is the first clone reproduced for the purposes of making a breeding animal from a sterile animal. REUTERS/Daniele La Monaca

Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion, a 48-day-old cloned foal, runs in a field outside Cremona, Italy, April 14, 2005. Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion was born February 25, 2005 from the genes of castrated endurance champion Pieraz, an Arab stallion. The...more

Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion, a 48-day-old cloned foal, runs in a field outside Cremona, Italy, April 14, 2005. Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion was born February 25, 2005 from the genes of castrated endurance champion Pieraz, an Arab stallion. The genetics companies LTR-CIZ and Cryzootech say that it is the first clone reproduced for the purposes of making a breeding animal from a sterile animal. REUTERS/Daniele La Monaca
Close
6 / 19
Noori, a cloned Pashmina goat walks inside its enclosure at the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry of Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology (SKUAST), in Shuhama, east of Srinagar March 15, 2012. Noori, which weighed 1.3 kg (2.9 lb) at birth on March 9, 2012, is the world's first cloned Pashmina goat, said Dr. Riaz Ahmad Shah, who heads the project at SKUAST. Pashmina goats, which grow a thick warm fleece, survive on grass in Ladakh where temperatures plunge to as low as minus 20 degrees Celsius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit). REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Noori, a cloned Pashmina goat walks inside its enclosure at the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry of Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology (SKUAST), in Shuhama, east of Srinagar March 15, 2012. Noori,...more

Noori, a cloned Pashmina goat walks inside its enclosure at the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry of Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology (SKUAST), in Shuhama, east of Srinagar March 15, 2012. Noori, which weighed 1.3 kg (2.9 lb) at birth on March 9, 2012, is the world's first cloned Pashmina goat, said Dr. Riaz Ahmad Shah, who heads the project at SKUAST. Pashmina goats, which grow a thick warm fleece, survive on grass in Ladakh where temperatures plunge to as low as minus 20 degrees Celsius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit). REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli
Close
7 / 19
A cloned fluorescent dog Ruppy (R), a 17-month-old beagle, and her three-month-old puppy are seen at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul May 13, 2009. The puppy is one of "2nd generation Ruppies", offspring of "Ruppy", the world's first transgenic dogs which carry fluorescent genes. Scientists took a fluorescent protein, much like that produced by some sea anemones, and inserted it into the cell of a beagle. The name "Ruppy" is a combination of the words "Ruby" and "Puppy", and the offsprings of such dogs will possess the same fluorescent gene as their mothers. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

A cloned fluorescent dog Ruppy (R), a 17-month-old beagle, and her three-month-old puppy are seen at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul May 13, 2009. The puppy is one of "2nd generation Ruppies", offspring of "Ruppy",...more

A cloned fluorescent dog Ruppy (R), a 17-month-old beagle, and her three-month-old puppy are seen at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul May 13, 2009. The puppy is one of "2nd generation Ruppies", offspring of "Ruppy", the world's first transgenic dogs which carry fluorescent genes. Scientists took a fluorescent protein, much like that produced by some sea anemones, and inserted it into the cell of a beagle. The name "Ruppy" is a combination of the words "Ruby" and "Puppy", and the offsprings of such dogs will possess the same fluorescent gene as their mothers. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak
Close
8 / 19
The world's first cloned camel, Injaz (front), is seen at the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai, April 15, 2009. The female camel calf was born on April 8, created from cells harvested from the ovary of an adult female camel that were grown in culture before being frozen in liquid nitrogen. REUTERS/Khalifa Al Yousef

The world's first cloned camel, Injaz (front), is seen at the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai, April 15, 2009. The female camel calf was born on April 8, created from cells harvested from the ovary of an adult female camel that were grown in...more

The world's first cloned camel, Injaz (front), is seen at the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai, April 15, 2009. The female camel calf was born on April 8, created from cells harvested from the ovary of an adult female camel that were grown in culture before being frozen in liquid nitrogen. REUTERS/Khalifa Al Yousef
Close
9 / 19
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, October 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak
Close
10 / 19
Cloned goats are displayed at the Shanghai Wild Animal Park in China January 30, 2003. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV

Cloned goats are displayed at the Shanghai Wild Animal Park in China January 30, 2003. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV

Cloned goats are displayed at the Shanghai Wild Animal Park in China January 30, 2003. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV
Close
11 / 19
Snuppy (C), the world's first dog cloned from adult cells by somatic nuclear cell transfer, and four cloned puppies pose for a photograph with researchers at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul, South  Korea, July 1, 2008. REUTERS/Ben Weller

Snuppy (C), the world's first dog cloned from adult cells by somatic nuclear cell transfer, and four cloned puppies pose for a photograph with researchers at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul, South Korea, July 1,...more

Snuppy (C), the world's first dog cloned from adult cells by somatic nuclear cell transfer, and four cloned puppies pose for a photograph with researchers at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul, South Korea, July 1, 2008. REUTERS/Ben Weller
Close
12 / 19
Two cloned kittens Tabouli and Baba Ganoush (L) are shown with the cat they were cloned from, Tahini (R), at the Cat Show New York, October 9, 2004. The two kittens were born in June 2004 and are a project of Genetic Savings & Clone Inc., which clones pets for owners. REUTERS/Jeff Christensen

Two cloned kittens Tabouli and Baba Ganoush (L) are shown with the cat they were cloned from, Tahini (R), at the Cat Show New York, October 9, 2004. The two kittens were born in June 2004 and are a project of Genetic Savings & Clone Inc., which...more

Two cloned kittens Tabouli and Baba Ganoush (L) are shown with the cat they were cloned from, Tahini (R), at the Cat Show New York, October 9, 2004. The two kittens were born in June 2004 and are a project of Genetic Savings & Clone Inc., which clones pets for owners. REUTERS/Jeff Christensen
Close
13 / 19
The first animal to be cloned in Africa, a healthy Holstein heifer called Futi, makes its debut May 7, 2003. Futi was born in the northwest province in South Africa on April 19, 2003, and was grown using genetic material from a single cell taken from the ear of a donor cow, which was inserted into an unfertilized cow egg, and later implanted into a recipient cow. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya

The first animal to be cloned in Africa, a healthy Holstein heifer called Futi, makes its debut May 7, 2003. Futi was born in the northwest province in South Africa on April 19, 2003, and was grown using genetic material from a single cell taken from...more

The first animal to be cloned in Africa, a healthy Holstein heifer called Futi, makes its debut May 7, 2003. Futi was born in the northwest province in South Africa on April 19, 2003, and was grown using genetic material from a single cell taken from the ear of a donor cow, which was inserted into an unfertilized cow egg, and later implanted into a recipient cow. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya
Close
14 / 19
Prometea (L), the world's first cloned horse, and its mother Stella Cometa eat grass in the grounds of the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona, northern Italy, August 7, 2003. Italian scientists said they have created the world's first cloned horse from an adult cell of a horse that gave birth to her genetic twin. Prometea weighed in at 36 kgs (80 lbs) when she was born during a natural delivery on May 28, 2003 after a normal, full-term pregnancy. REUTERS/Max Rossi

Prometea (L), the world's first cloned horse, and its mother Stella Cometa eat grass in the grounds of the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona, northern Italy, August 7, 2003. Italian scientists said they have created the world's first...more

Prometea (L), the world's first cloned horse, and its mother Stella Cometa eat grass in the grounds of the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona, northern Italy, August 7, 2003. Italian scientists said they have created the world's first cloned horse from an adult cell of a horse that gave birth to her genetic twin. Prometea weighed in at 36 kgs (80 lbs) when she was born during a natural delivery on May 28, 2003 after a normal, full-term pregnancy. REUTERS/Max Rossi
Close
15 / 19
The world's first-ever cloned cat, called "CC," is seen at seven weeks old with Allie, her surrogate mother, December 22, 2001. The kitten is the first successful product of a program aimed at letting people clone their beloved pets at Texas A&M University in College Station. REUTERS/Stringer

The world's first-ever cloned cat, called "CC," is seen at seven weeks old with Allie, her surrogate mother, December 22, 2001. The kitten is the first successful product of a program aimed at letting people clone their beloved pets at Texas A&M...more

The world's first-ever cloned cat, called "CC," is seen at seven weeks old with Allie, her surrogate mother, December 22, 2001. The kitten is the first successful product of a program aimed at letting people clone their beloved pets at Texas A&M University in College Station. REUTERS/Stringer
Close
16 / 19
Narcotic-sniffing dogs look out from an enclosure at a training centre of the Korea Customs Service (KCS) in Incheon, west of Seoul, April 24, 2008. The puppies, which were born in October and November of 2007, are clones of a Labrador retriever named Chase. The dogs have been in training almost since birth and show strong signs of possessing the genes necessary to combat narcotics trafficking, KCS said. REUTERS/Lee Ji-yeon

Narcotic-sniffing dogs look out from an enclosure at a training centre of the Korea Customs Service (KCS) in Incheon, west of Seoul, April 24, 2008. The puppies, which were born in October and November of 2007, are clones of a Labrador retriever...more

Narcotic-sniffing dogs look out from an enclosure at a training centre of the Korea Customs Service (KCS) in Incheon, west of Seoul, April 24, 2008. The puppies, which were born in October and November of 2007, are clones of a Labrador retriever named Chase. The dogs have been in training almost since birth and show strong signs of possessing the genes necessary to combat narcotics trafficking, KCS said. REUTERS/Lee Ji-yeon
Close
17 / 19
Twin baby monkeys born from cloned embryos clutch each other at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center in Beaverton, Oregon March 4, 2005. The procedure used to produce the monkeys last year, nuclear embryo transfer, confirms that genetically identical twin monkeys can be reproduced. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Twin baby monkeys born from cloned embryos clutch each other at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center in Beaverton, Oregon March 4, 2005. The procedure used to produce the monkeys last year, nuclear embryo transfer, confirms that genetically...more

Twin baby monkeys born from cloned embryos clutch each other at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center in Beaverton, Oregon March 4, 2005. The procedure used to produce the monkeys last year, nuclear embryo transfer, confirms that genetically identical twin monkeys can be reproduced. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
Close
18 / 19
Seoul National University's professor Lee Byung-chun (C) and his researchers show three genetically identical Afghan hound clones, named Bona (L), Hope and Peace (R) during a photo opportunity at the university in Seoul, South Korea December 18, 2006. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Seoul National University's professor Lee Byung-chun (C) and his researchers show three genetically identical Afghan hound clones, named Bona (L), Hope and Peace (R) during a photo opportunity at the university in Seoul, South Korea December 18,...more

Seoul National University's professor Lee Byung-chun (C) and his researchers show three genetically identical Afghan hound clones, named Bona (L), Hope and Peace (R) during a photo opportunity at the university in Seoul, South Korea December 18, 2006. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Close
19 / 19

Next Slideshows

Olympic team outfits

Countries show off their patriotic flair for the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Jan 23 2018

Stuck!

Lending a helping hand to those trapped in unusual predicaments.

Jan 23 2018

Marking the Epiphany

Orthodox Christians celebrate Epiphany by immersing themselves in waters.

Jan 19 2018

Venezuela's empty shelves

Despite hours in lines, Venezuelans increasingly find groceries have run out before they can buy them.

Jan 19 2018

MORE IN PICTURES

Deadly bridge collapse in Italy

Deadly bridge collapse in Italy

A 50-meter-high section of a motorway bridge crashed down onto warehouses, train tracks and a riverbed in Genoa, killing at least 39 people.

The plight of Italy's African laborers

The plight of Italy's African laborers

Two recent fatal crashes, resulting in the deaths of 16 migrant workers, have brought into focus the dire working and living conditions imposed on thousands of migrant farmhands whose cut-price labor allows Italy to be one of the biggest fruit and vegetable exporters in Europe.

Off-the-grid nightmare at New Mexico compound

Off-the-grid nightmare at New Mexico compound

Five adults face child abuse charges after authorities raided their ramshackle homestead in New Mexico and found the body of a young boy and 11 more children described by authorities as starving and ragged.

Remembering the East Coast blackout

Remembering the East Coast blackout

The 2003 East Coast blackout, caused by a few benign tree branches, plunged 50 million into darkness and laid bare the vulnerabilities of an aging electric grid in the most populous region of the United States.

Car hits pedestrians outside UK parliament

Car hits pedestrians outside UK parliament

A man deliberately drove a car into pedestrians and cyclists before ramming it into barriers outside Britain's parliament in what appeared to be the second terrorism attack on the building in just under 18 months, police said.

A day at the state fair

A day at the state fair

Spending a summer day at the state fair, from New Jersey to Iowa.

North and South Korean workers hold soccer friendly

North and South Korean workers hold soccer friendly

South Korean labor unions welcomed a North Korean delegation of workers for a friendly soccer match with their southern counterparts in Seoul.

Korean pop culture in L.A. spotlight

Korean pop culture in L.A. spotlight

Tens of thousands of fans celebrate Korean pop, or K-pop, at the 7th annual KCON convention in Los Angeles.

Trump's show of military strength

Trump's show of military strength

President Donald Trump watched an air assault demonstration at Fort Drum in upstate New York before signing a $716-billion defense policy bill that authorizes military spending and includes watered-down controls on U.S. government contracts with China's ZTE and Huawei Technologies.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast