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Pictures | Fri Jan 10, 2020 | 4:30pm EST

Daisy the robot recycles Apple iPhones

Aluminum cases are seen after iPhones were deconstructed by Daisy, a recycling robot, inside a nondescript warehouse on the outskirts of Austin, Texas. Daisy has been designed to break apart iPhones so that 14 minerals, including lithium, can be extracted and recycled. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Aluminum cases are seen after iPhones were deconstructed by Daisy, a recycling robot, inside a nondescript warehouse on the outskirts of Austin, Texas. Daisy has been designed to break apart iPhones so that 14 minerals, including lithium, can be...more

Aluminum cases are seen after iPhones were deconstructed by Daisy, a recycling robot, inside a nondescript warehouse on the outskirts of Austin, Texas. Daisy has been designed to break apart iPhones so that 14 minerals, including lithium, can be extracted and recycled. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Pieces of shredded aluminum iPhone cases. Apple is trying to change the way electronics are recycled with a robot that disassembles its iconic iPhone so that minerals can be recovered and reused, but rising global demand for electronics means new mines will still be needed by manufacturers.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Pieces of shredded aluminum iPhone cases. Apple is trying to change the way electronics are recycled with a robot that disassembles its iconic iPhone so that minerals can be recovered and reused, but rising global demand for electronics means new...more

Pieces of shredded aluminum iPhone cases. Apple is trying to change the way electronics are recycled with a robot that disassembles its iconic iPhone so that minerals can be recovered and reused, but rising global demand for electronics means new mines will still be needed by manufacturers. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin, Texas. The Cupertino, California-based company says the robot is part of its plan to become a "closed-loop" manufacturer that does not rely on the mining industry, an aggressive goal that some industry analysts have said is impossible.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin, Texas. The Cupertino, California-based company says the robot is part of its plan to become a "closed-loop" manufacturer that does not rely on the mining industry, an aggressive goal that some...more

Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin, Texas. The Cupertino, California-based company says the robot is part of its plan to become a "closed-loop" manufacturer that does not rely on the mining industry, an aggressive goal that some industry analysts have said is impossible. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted during the last step for the Daisy recycling robot. Apple is already using recycled aluminum, tin, cobalt and rare earths in some of its products, with plans to add to that list in coming years.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted during the last step for the Daisy recycling robot. Apple is already using recycled aluminum, tin, cobalt and rare earths in some of its products, with plans to add to that list in...more

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted during the last step for the Daisy recycling robot. Apple is already using recycled aluminum, tin, cobalt and rare earths in some of its products, with plans to add to that list in coming years. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Daisy, less than 20 yards in length, uses a four-step process to remove an iPhone's battery with a blast of -80 Celsius (-176 Fahrenheit) degree air, and then pop out screws and modules, including the haptic monitor (pictured) that makes a phone vibrate.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Daisy, less than 20 yards in length, uses a four-step process to remove an iPhone's battery with a blast of -80 Celsius (-176 Fahrenheit) degree air, and then pop out screws and modules, including the haptic monitor (pictured) that makes a phone...more

Daisy, less than 20 yards in length, uses a four-step process to remove an iPhone's battery with a blast of -80 Celsius (-176 Fahrenheit) degree air, and then pop out screws and modules, including the haptic monitor (pictured) that makes a phone vibrate. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Camera modules from iPhones are sorted for further processing. The components are then sent off to recyclers for the minerals to be extracted and refined. Daisy can tear apart 200 iPhones per hour. In 2017, the robot in Austin processed 1 million iPhones, Apple said.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Camera modules from iPhones are sorted for further processing. The components are then sent off to recyclers for the minerals to be extracted and refined. Daisy can tear apart 200 iPhones per hour. In 2017, the robot in Austin processed 1 million...more

Camera modules from iPhones are sorted for further processing. The components are then sent off to recyclers for the minerals to be extracted and refined. Daisy can tear apart 200 iPhones per hour. In 2017, the robot in Austin processed 1 million iPhones, Apple said. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Camera modules and speaker modules removed from iPhones by Daisy. Apple chose the iPhone to be the first of its products that Daisy would disassemble because of its mass popularity, said Lisa Jackson, the company's head of environment, policy and social initiatives.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Camera modules and speaker modules removed from iPhones by Daisy. Apple chose the iPhone to be the first of its products that Daisy would disassemble because of its mass popularity, said Lisa Jackson, the company's head of environment, policy and...more

Camera modules and speaker modules removed from iPhones by Daisy. Apple chose the iPhone to be the first of its products that Daisy would disassemble because of its mass popularity, said Lisa Jackson, the company's head of environment, policy and social initiatives. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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A small-scale traditional recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Apple is considering sharing the Daisy technology with others, including electric automakers. Daisy does have its skeptics, including many in the tech world who see it primarily as a public relations stunt. "There's this ego that believes they can get all their minerals back, and it's not possible," said Kyle Wiens, chief executive of iFixit, a firm dedicated to repairing rather than discarding iPhones and other electronics.

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

A small-scale traditional recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Apple is considering sharing the Daisy technology with others, including electric automakers. Daisy does have its skeptics, including...more

A small-scale traditional recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Apple is considering sharing the Daisy technology with others, including electric automakers. Daisy does have its skeptics, including many in the tech world who see it primarily as a public relations stunt. "There's this ego that believes they can get all their minerals back, and it's not possible," said Kyle Wiens, chief executive of iFixit, a firm dedicated to repairing rather than discarding iPhones and other electronics. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted. "Apple is in an enviable position, because they can do this," said Tom Butler, president of the International Council on Mining and Metals, an industry trade group. "Not everyone else will be able to follow suit."

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted. "Apple is in an enviable position, because they can do this," said Tom Butler, president of the International Council on Mining and Metals, an industry trade group. "Not everyone else...more

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted. "Apple is in an enviable position, because they can do this," said Tom Butler, president of the International Council on Mining and Metals, an industry trade group. "Not everyone else will be able to follow suit." REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Many mining executives also note that with the rising popularity of electric vehicles, newly mined minerals will be needed in even larger scale, a reality that Apple acknowledges. "We're not necessarily competing with the folks who mine," said Apple's Jackson, who ran the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Barack Obama. "There's nothing for miners to fear in this development."

REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Many mining executives also note that with the rising popularity of electric vehicles, newly mined minerals will be needed in even larger scale, a reality that Apple acknowledges. "We're not...more

Daisy is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. Many mining executives also note that with the rising popularity of electric vehicles, newly mined minerals will be needed in even larger scale, a reality that Apple acknowledges. "We're not necessarily competing with the folks who mine," said Apple's Jackson, who ran the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Barack Obama. "There's nothing for miners to fear in this development." REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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iPhone haptic touch modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone haptic touch modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone haptic touch modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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iPhone speaker modules are sorted for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone speaker modules are sorted for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone speaker modules are sorted for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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iPhone camera modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone camera modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

iPhone camera modules are sorted into large bins for further processing. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted at the last step for the iPhone recycling robot, Daisy. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted at the last step for the iPhone recycling robot, Daisy. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

The remnants of various iPhone models are left to be hand-sorted at the last step for the iPhone recycling robot, Daisy. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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A small scale traditional e-waste recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

A small scale traditional e-waste recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

A small scale traditional e-waste recycling setup for testing purposes is seen at an Apple recycling facility in Austin. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
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