Edition:
United States
Pictures | Tue May 15, 2012 | 10:05am EDT

Dumpster diners

<p>May Wollf, (L), 28, a practising 'freegan', climbs into a dumpster while Robin Pickell tears open a garbage bag in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012.  A 'Freegan' is someone who gathers edible food from the garbage bins of grocery stores or food stands that would otherwise have been thrown away. Freegans aim to spend little or no money purchasing food and other goods, not through financial need but to try to address issues of over-consumption and excess. REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

May Wollf, (L), 28, a practising 'freegan', climbs into a dumpster while Robin Pickell tears open a garbage bag in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. A 'Freegan' is someone who gathers edible food from...more

May Wollf, (L), 28, a practising 'freegan', climbs into a dumpster while Robin Pickell tears open a garbage bag in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. A 'Freegan' is someone who gathers edible food from the garbage bins of grocery stores or food stands that would otherwise have been thrown away. Freegans aim to spend little or no money purchasing food and other goods, not through financial need but to try to address issues of over-consumption and excess. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
1 / 17
<p>Mya Wollf (R), 28, and Robin Pickell, 23, practising 'freegans', sort through food they recently found in a dumpster behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Mya Wollf (R), 28, and Robin Pickell, 23, practising 'freegans', sort through food they recently found in a dumpster behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Mya Wollf (R), 28, and Robin Pickell, 23, practising 'freegans', sort through food they recently found in a dumpster behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
2 / 17
<p>Robin Pickell, 23, a 'freegan', rides her bike to different dumpsters to find edible food in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012.   REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Robin Pickell, 23, a 'freegan', rides her bike to different dumpsters to find edible food in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Robin Pickell, 23, a 'freegan', rides her bike to different dumpsters to find edible food in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
3 / 17
<p>Robin Pickell, a 'freegan', eats a green bean that was scavenged in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012.       REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Robin Pickell, a 'freegan', eats a green bean that was scavenged in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Robin Pickell, a 'freegan', eats a green bean that was scavenged in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
4 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a pracitsing 'freegan', looks through her fridge of scavenged food at her house in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Ben Nelms</p>

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a pracitsing 'freegan', looks through her fridge of scavenged food at her house in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a pracitsing 'freegan', looks through her fridge of scavenged food at her house in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
5 / 17
<p>Madison Dewalt, a 'freegan', prepares food that was scavenged by the household in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012.  REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Madison Dewalt, a 'freegan', prepares food that was scavenged by the household in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Madison Dewalt, a 'freegan', prepares food that was scavenged by the household in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
6 / 17
<p>May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', cuts scavenged bread in her kitchen in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', cuts scavenged bread in her kitchen in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', cuts scavenged bread in her kitchen in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
7 / 17
<p>May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', holds a sandwich that is made entirely out of found or donated food in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012.      REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', holds a sandwich that is made entirely out of found or donated food in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

May Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan', holds a sandwich that is made entirely out of found or donated food in Vancouver, British Columbia April 11, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
8 / 17
<p>May Wollf (C) and Robin Pickell (R), practising 'freegans', sort through food they plucked out of a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 26, 2012.  REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

May Wollf (C) and Robin Pickell (R), practising 'freegans', sort through food they plucked out of a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 26, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

May Wollf (C) and Robin Pickell (R), practising 'freegans', sort through food they plucked out of a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 26, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
9 / 17
<p>Robin Pickell, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for over four years is pictured behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012.     REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Robin Pickell, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for over four years is pictured behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Robin Pickell, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for over four years is pictured behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
10 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass, 23 (L) and Robin Pickell, who are both 'freegans', climb into a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012.   REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23 (L) and Robin Pickell, who are both 'freegans', climb into a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23 (L) and Robin Pickell, who are both 'freegans', climb into a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
11 / 17
<p>Robin Pickell, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food in an alley behind in Vancouver, British Columbia April 26, 2012.     REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Robin Pickell, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food in an alley behind in Vancouver, British Columbia April 26, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Robin Pickell, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food in an alley behind in Vancouver, British Columbia April 26, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
12 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012.     REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
13 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practising 'freegans', react to finding food in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012.    REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practising 'freegans', react to finding food in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practising 'freegans', react to finding food in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
14 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practicsing 'freegans' inspect cashew ice-cream in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012.    REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practicsing 'freegans' inspect cashew ice-cream in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practicsing 'freegans' inspect cashew ice-cream in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
15 / 17
<p>Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', eats food that she recently found in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia, April 5, 2012.    REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', eats food that she recently found in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia, April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', eats food that she recently found in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia, April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
16 / 17
<p>Mya Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for nine years, shows off her 'vegan' tattoo in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012.   REUTERS/Ben Nelms </p>

Mya Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for nine years, shows off her 'vegan' tattoo in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Mya Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for nine years, shows off her 'vegan' tattoo in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia April 10, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Nelms

Close
17 / 17

Next Slideshows

The oldest yoga teacher

Tao Porchon-Lynch, 93, was named the world's oldest yoga teacher by Guinness World Records.

May 14 2012

Life in Warsaw

A look at life in the Polish capital of Warsaw, home of the Euro 2012 soccer championships.

May 14 2012

The art of Anish Kapoor

A showcase of work by Anish Kapoor, who created the spiraling red tower on London's Olympic Park.

May 11 2012

Ageless beauty contest

An elderly beauty contest in honor of Mother's Day.

May 11 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

Trump's first year in office

Trump's first year in office

Images from the first year of Donald Trump's presidency.

America divided over Trump

America divided over Trump

From supporters' rallies to Women's Marches, a look back at a year of polarized politics.

Larry Nassar's victims speak out

Larry Nassar's victims speak out

Nearly 100 women deliver victim impact statements during sentencing for former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, who pleaded guilty in November to multiple counts of sexual assault.

Pope visits Chile and Peru

Pope visits Chile and Peru

Pope Francis hopes to inject new confidence in the two staunchly Catholic countries where the Church's credibility has been severely damaged by sexual abuse scandals.

North Korea's eclectic architecture

North Korea's eclectic architecture

Futuristic skyscrapers meet socialist monuments in the reclusive state.

Best of Australian Open

Best of Australian Open

Highlights as the top seeds face off in Melbourne.

Dakar Rally 2018

Dakar Rally 2018

Stunning images as vehicles race from Peru to Argentina.

Marking the Epiphany

Marking the Epiphany

Orthodox Christians celebrate Epiphany by immersing themselves in waters.

Venezuela's empty shelves

Venezuela's empty shelves

Despite hours in lines, Venezuelans increasingly find groceries have run out before they can buy them.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast