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Pictures | Thu Feb 13, 2020 | 11:45pm EST

Grief, activism and remembrance after Parkland shooting

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, March 24, 2018. There were sobs as Gonzalez read the names of the 17 victims and then stood in silence. Tears ran down her cheeks as she stared out over the crowd for the rest of a speech that lasted six minutes and 20 seconds, the time it took for the gunman to slaughter them.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in...more

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, March 24, 2018. There were sobs as Gonzalez read the names of the 17 victims and then stood in silence. Tears ran down her cheeks as she stared out over the crowd for the rest of a speech that lasted six minutes and 20 seconds, the time it took for the gunman to slaughter them. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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The 'Temple of Time', a structure built to serve as a healing place for those affected by the shooting, is burned in a ceremonial fire in Coral Springs, Florida, May 19, 2019. A California-based artist erected the 35-foot-tall, wooden 'Temple of Time' commemorating the victims. It was adorned with remembrances of the lives lost and was razed a few weeks later, similar to the annual Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert.

REUTERS/Joe Skipper

The 'Temple of Time', a structure built to serve as a healing place for those affected by the shooting, is burned in a ceremonial fire in Coral Springs, Florida, May 19, 2019. A California-based artist erected the 35-foot-tall, wooden 'Temple of...more

The 'Temple of Time', a structure built to serve as a healing place for those affected by the shooting, is burned in a ceremonial fire in Coral Springs, Florida, May 19, 2019. A California-based artist erected the 35-foot-tall, wooden 'Temple of Time' commemorating the victims. It was adorned with remembrances of the lives lost and was razed a few weeks later, similar to the annual Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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David Hogg and Emma Gonzalez of Parkland High School participate in the S42 protest calling for stricter gun control in commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the March For Our Lives at the Capitol in Washington, March 25, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy

David Hogg and Emma Gonzalez of Parkland High School participate in the S42 protest calling for stricter gun control in commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the March For Our Lives at the Capitol in Washington, March 25, 2019. REUTERS/Michael...more

David Hogg and Emma Gonzalez of Parkland High School participate in the S42 protest calling for stricter gun control in commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the March For Our Lives at the Capitol in Washington, March 25, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
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Fred Guttenberg, father of Parkland victim Jaime Guttenberg, is ejected after shouting during President Donald Trump's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in the House Chamber of the Capitol in Washington, February 4, 2020. For Guttenberg, fighting for gun control is a way to cope when he thinks about the final moments for his daughter, Jaime. "What I have discovered this year is I have this need to still be Jaime's dad," he said in 2019. "I am not going to ever stop talking about my daughter and what she meant to me -- and what the moments without her mean to me."

REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Fred Guttenberg, father of Parkland victim Jaime Guttenberg, is ejected after shouting during President Donald Trump's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in the House Chamber of the Capitol in Washington, February 4, 2020. For...more

Fred Guttenberg, father of Parkland victim Jaime Guttenberg, is ejected after shouting during President Donald Trump's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in the House Chamber of the Capitol in Washington, February 4, 2020. For Guttenberg, fighting for gun control is a way to cope when he thinks about the final moments for his daughter, Jaime. "What I have discovered this year is I have this need to still be Jaime's dad," he said in 2019. "I am not going to ever stop talking about my daughter and what she meant to me -- and what the moments without her mean to me." REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Parkland student Sari Kaufman asks 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders a question during the Presidential Gun Sense Forum in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. REUTERS/Scott Morgan

Parkland student Sari Kaufman asks 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders a question during the Presidential Gun Sense Forum in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. REUTERS/Scott Morgan

Parkland student Sari Kaufman asks 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders a question during the Presidential Gun Sense Forum in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
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A sneaker that Emma Gonzalez, a gun control activist and Parkland survivor, wore the day of the shooting is seen on a table as she speaks at a press conference on the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in New York City, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A sneaker that Emma Gonzalez, a gun control activist and Parkland survivor, wore the day of the shooting is seen on a table as she speaks at a press conference on the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in New York City, February 14, 2019....more

A sneaker that Emma Gonzalez, a gun control activist and Parkland survivor, wore the day of the shooting is seen on a table as she speaks at a press conference on the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in New York City, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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The crowd attends a memorial service on the one-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

The crowd attends a memorial service on the one-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

The crowd attends a memorial service on the one-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers, and the president, change this law," said the then-19-year-old senior, who traveled to the state capital to lobby for a ban on assault-style rifles a week after the shooting. "Three people I looked to for advice and courage are gone but never forgotten, and for them, I am going to our state capital to tell lawmakers we are tired and exhausted of stupid gun laws."

REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers,...more

Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers, and the president, change this law," said the then-19-year-old senior, who traveled to the state capital to lobby for a ban on assault-style rifles a week after the shooting. "Three people I looked to for advice and courage are gone but never forgotten, and for them, I am going to our state capital to tell lawmakers we are tired and exhausted of stupid gun laws." REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate when the shooter entered her classroom.

REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate...more

Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate when the shooter entered her classroom. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
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Max Schachter channeled his grief into school safety advocacy, focused on identifying best practices for school security after his 14-year-old son Alex died in English class at MSD. But success can be both satisfying and hollow. "It doesn't bring my son back," Schachter said in 2019. 

REUTERS/Kevin Fogarty

Max Schachter channeled his grief into school safety advocacy, focused on identifying best practices for school security after his 14-year-old son Alex died in English class at MSD. But success can be both satisfying and hollow. "It doesn't bring my...more

Max Schachter channeled his grief into school safety advocacy, focused on identifying best practices for school security after his 14-year-old son Alex died in English class at MSD. But success can be both satisfying and hollow. "It doesn't bring my son back," Schachter said in 2019. REUTERS/Kevin Fogarty
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David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student said during the rally, pointing at the white-domed Capitol behind the stage. 

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student...more

David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student said during the rally, pointing at the white-domed Capitol behind the stage. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Parkland student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Parkland student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Parkland student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school shooting survivors and students at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school...more

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school shooting survivors and students at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of 2019 Twitter messages, Tarr, a March for Our Lives co-founder, reflected on having to put on a composed "performance" over the past year as a public figure on social media. "I can't sit back and let you think that I'm always fine, that I'm always ready to go. That's not realistic," she wrote. "I'm a human being and god damn if all of this work and pain isn't hard."

REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of 2019 Twitter...more

Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of 2019 Twitter messages, Tarr, a March for Our Lives co-founder, reflected on having to put on a composed "performance" over the past year as a public figure on social media. "I can't sit back and let you think that I'm always fine, that I'm always ready to go. That's not realistic," she wrote. "I'm a human being and god damn if all of this work and pain isn't hard." REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students who have toured the nation to encourage young people to register and vote for pro-gun control candidates. "We have to replace these terrible actors who are comfortable putting our lives at risk for a check from the NRA (National Rifle Association)," said Deitsch, the chief strategist for March for Our Lives, referring to political incumbents who oppose the group's goals, which include a ban on assault weapons. "The fact that gun violence is a top issue for the first time ever is something that should scare the people arrayed against us," he said. "We carry a heavy weight, and every single day there's another mass shooting in America, and we see ourselves as vessels amplifying what's going on this country," Deitsch said.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students...more

Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students who have toured the nation to encourage young people to register and vote for pro-gun control candidates. "We have to replace these terrible actors who are comfortable putting our lives at risk for a check from the NRA (National Rifle Association)," said Deitsch, the chief strategist for March for Our Lives, referring to political incumbents who oppose the group's goals, which include a ban on assault weapons. "The fact that gun violence is a top issue for the first time ever is something that should scare the people arrayed against us," he said. "We carry a heavy weight, and every single day there's another mass shooting in America, and we see ourselves as vessels amplifying what's going on this country," Deitsch said. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, who witnessed the MSD shooting, launched the social media project to collate footage of the incident. It has evolved into a broader effort to encourage victims of gun violence around the country to share their stories. He says the reaction to Parkland was notably different from previous mass shootings, in part because it affected a group of teenagers well-versed in using social media. The Parkland attack "affected high-school kids, millennials, Generation Z-ers - we practically have a road map of what we need to do."

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, who...more

Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, who witnessed the MSD shooting, launched the social media project to collate footage of the incident. It has evolved into a broader effort to encourage victims of gun violence around the country to share their stories. He says the reaction to Parkland was notably different from previous mass shootings, in part because it affected a group of teenagers well-versed in using social media. The Parkland attack "affected high-school kids, millennials, Generation Z-ers - we practically have a road map of what we need to do." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her energy into spending time with family and focuses on studying piano and playing tennis to avoid thinking about that day. "We've become a more united community after everything that happened," she said. "With the leadership of my classmates, we can raise our voices so that people understand that these changes need to happen."

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her...more

Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her energy into spending time with family and focuses on studying piano and playing tennis to avoid thinking about that day. "We've become a more united community after everything that happened," she said. "With the leadership of my classmates, we can raise our voices so that people understand that these changes need to happen." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. 

REUTERS/Leah Millis

Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. 

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Martin Luther King Jr.'s granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Martin Luther King Jr.'s granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Maddie Gaffrey holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener

Maddie Gaffrey holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener

Maddie Gaffrey holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener
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Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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Parent Melissa Blank (L) and MSD surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school safety and shootings, at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Parent Melissa Blank (L) and MSD surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school safety and shootings,...more

Parent Melissa Blank (L) and MSD surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school safety and shootings, at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Michael J. Weissman, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Michael J. Weissman, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Michael J. Weissman, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
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MSD student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses traveling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

MSD student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses traveling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

MSD student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses traveling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Patricia Padauy, the mother of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up her son's diploma during his graduation ceremony in Sunrise, Florida, June 3, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Patricia Padauy, the mother of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up her son's diploma during his graduation ceremony in Sunrise, Florida, June 3, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Patricia Padauy, the mother of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up her son's diploma during his graduation ceremony in Sunrise, Florida, June 3, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Manuel Oliver, father of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up a placard as he paints a mural to commemorate the victims of the shooting and promote gun control in Los Angeles, April 7, 2018. As he paints the mural, Oliver listens to his son's favorite music on the headphones that belonged to him. Since the mass shooting, Oliver, a 50-year-old artistic director, has traveled across the country, building murals in honor of his son. He calls the murals "Walls of Demand." In Los Angeles, he painted a mural with rifle targets set atop a silhouette of an image of Joaquin as he walked to school that day with a bouquet of sunflowers in his hand to give to his girlfriend. Once completed, he drove a hammer into the mural 17 times, one for each victim, and hung a sunflower in each hole. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Manuel Oliver, father of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up a placard as he paints a mural to commemorate the victims of the shooting and promote gun control in Los Angeles, April 7, 2018. As he paints the mural, Oliver listens to his son's...more

Manuel Oliver, father of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, holds up a placard as he paints a mural to commemorate the victims of the shooting and promote gun control in Los Angeles, April 7, 2018. As he paints the mural, Oliver listens to his son's favorite music on the headphones that belonged to him. Since the mass shooting, Oliver, a 50-year-old artistic director, has traveled across the country, building murals in honor of his son. He calls the murals "Walls of Demand." In Los Angeles, he painted a mural with rifle targets set atop a silhouette of an image of Joaquin as he walked to school that day with a bouquet of sunflowers in his hand to give to his girlfriend. Once completed, he drove a hammer into the mural 17 times, one for each victim, and hung a sunflower in each hole. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Students from Gonzaga College High School in Washington hold up signs with the names of those killed in the Parkland school shooting during a walkout at the Capitol in Washington, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Students from Gonzaga College High School in Washington hold up signs with the names of those killed in the Parkland school shooting during a walkout at the Capitol in Washington, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Students from Gonzaga College High School in Washington hold up signs with the names of those killed in the Parkland school shooting during a walkout at the Capitol in Washington, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Attendees are seen at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Attendees are seen at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Attendees are seen at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas student and shooting survivor Sam Fuentes (R), from Parkland, Florida, laughs with another student after Fuentes vomited while speaking at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student and shooting survivor Sam Fuentes (R), from Parkland, Florida, laughs with another student after Fuentes vomited while speaking at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student and shooting survivor Sam Fuentes (R), from Parkland, Florida, laughs with another student after Fuentes vomited while speaking at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Students march from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Students march from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Students march from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Students marching from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School react as they stand next to a memorial at a nearby park during the National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Students marching from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School react as they stand next to a memorial at a nearby park during the National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Students marching from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Westglades Middle School react as they stand next to a memorial at a nearby park during the National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Lenore Munoz, 17, speaks to a crowd of students after they marched to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Lenore Munoz, 17, speaks to a crowd of students after they marched to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Lenore Munoz, 17, speaks to a crowd of students after they marched to a nearby park as part of a National School Walkout in Parkland, Florida, March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Parkland student Adin Chistian embraces his mother Denyse next to the crosses and Stars of David placed in front of the school fence to commemorate the victims in Parkland, Florida, February 19, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Parkland student Adin Chistian embraces his mother Denyse next to the crosses and Stars of David placed in front of the school fence to commemorate the victims in Parkland, Florida, February 19, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Parkland student Adin Chistian embraces his mother Denyse next to the crosses and Stars of David placed in front of the school fence to commemorate the victims in Parkland, Florida, February 19, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Deadly shootings in Germany

Deadly shootings in Germany

A gunman suspected of shooting nine people dead at two shisha bars in the southwestern German city of Hanau has been found dead at his home, police said.

Key moments from the Democratic debate in Las Vegas

Key moments from the Democratic debate in Las Vegas

Michael Bloomberg came under heavy fire during his first Democratic presidential debate in Nevada, with his rivals leaping to attack him as a billionaire copy of President Donald Trump and criticizing his record on race and history of sexist comments.

Democrats campaign in Nevada

Democrats campaign in Nevada

Democratic presidential candidates campaign in Nevada, where reaching Latino voters and winning union support will be key to success in the state's caucus on Feb. 22.

Best of Milan Fashion Week

Best of Milan Fashion Week

Backstage and collection highlights from London Fashion Week.

Blockades across Canada to protest pipeline

Blockades across Canada to protest pipeline

Protesters blocked railways and ports and held demonstrations across Canada in support of the Wet'suwet'en Nation, an indigenous community whose hereditary chiefs oppose construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline project on their lands.

75 years since the Battle of Iwo Jima

75 years since the Battle of Iwo Jima

This month marks the 75th anniversary of the start of the Battle of Iwo Jima, where close to 7,000 U.S. Marines and nearly all of the 21,000 Japanese defenders of the island died during the 36-day battle.

Passengers finally depart coronavirus cruise ship

Passengers finally depart coronavirus cruise ship

Hundreds of people began disembarking a cruise ship in Japan after being held on board for more than two weeks under quarantine.

Security forces clash with protesters in Chile

Security forces clash with protesters in Chile

Unrest continues in Chile as protests that began in October over a rise in transport fares continue against Chile's government.

Best of the Brit Awards

Best of the Brit Awards

Highlights from the Brit Awards in London.

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