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Pictures | Fri Aug 11, 2017 | 9:15am EDT

Guam shrugs off North Korea threat

Pupils sit on the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific territory. With all the sabre-rattling of North Korea and the prospect of the waters off Guam becoming a new testing ground for its intermediate-range missiles, the people of this tiny U.S. Pacific territory seem to be taking things in their stride.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Pupils sit on the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific territory. With all the sabre-rattling of North Korea and the prospect of the waters off Guam becoming a new testing ground for its...more

Pupils sit on the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific territory. With all the sabre-rattling of North Korea and the prospect of the waters off Guam becoming a new testing ground for its intermediate-range missiles, the people of this tiny U.S. Pacific territory seem to be taking things in their stride. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists frolic along Tumon beach. There were no signs of panic or an exodus from the island of 163,000 people on Thursday, with its wide roads clogged with commuters and commercial vehicles and shops and restaurants doing brisk trade from South Korean and Japanese tourists drawn to the island's green hills and bright turquoise waters.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists frolic along Tumon beach. There were no signs of panic or an exodus from the island of 163,000 people on Thursday, with its wide roads clogged with commuters and commercial vehicles and shops and restaurants doing brisk trade from South...more

Tourists frolic along Tumon beach. There were no signs of panic or an exodus from the island of 163,000 people on Thursday, with its wide roads clogged with commuters and commercial vehicles and shops and restaurants doing brisk trade from South Korean and Japanese tourists drawn to the island's green hills and bright turquoise waters. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists stroll along a road on the island of Guam. Clarissa Baumgartner, a 25-year old Guam resident, said Pyongyang's second threat in as many days to train its ballistic missiles on Guam wasn't something she was taking too seriously. "I'm not really too worried about it. I feel it would be a pretty stupid idea to do that," she said.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists stroll along a road on the island of Guam. Clarissa Baumgartner, a 25-year old Guam resident, said Pyongyang's second threat in as many days to train its ballistic missiles on Guam wasn't something she was taking too seriously. "I'm not...more

Tourists stroll along a road on the island of Guam. Clarissa Baumgartner, a 25-year old Guam resident, said Pyongyang's second threat in as many days to train its ballistic missiles on Guam wasn't something she was taking too seriously. "I'm not really too worried about it. I feel it would be a pretty stupid idea to do that," she said. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists frolic on the waters overlooking posh hotels in Tumon tourist district. Baumgartner, a supervisor at a high-end clothing store, said she was confident U.S. forces on the island's two bases were ready to intervene, and she bore no grudges about that military presence making Guam a North Korean target. "Definitely, I know Guam is a pretty good target because it's important to the U.S. because of the military," she said. "I'm pretty confident that the U.S. will protect us. It makes me feel pretty good." U.S. forces on the island were not immediately available for comment.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists frolic on the waters overlooking posh hotels in Tumon tourist district. Baumgartner, a supervisor at a high-end clothing store, said she was confident U.S. forces on the island's two bases were ready to intervene, and she bore no grudges...more

Tourists frolic on the waters overlooking posh hotels in Tumon tourist district. Baumgartner, a supervisor at a high-end clothing store, said she was confident U.S. forces on the island's two bases were ready to intervene, and she bore no grudges about that military presence making Guam a North Korean target. "Definitely, I know Guam is a pretty good target because it's important to the U.S. because of the military," she said. "I'm pretty confident that the U.S. will protect us. It makes me feel pretty good." U.S. forces on the island were not immediately available for comment. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists wait for a bus in the Tumon tourist district. In response to President Donald Trump's tough rhetoric, North Korea said on Thursday it was finalising plans to fire four intermediate-range missiles that would land 30-40 km (18-25 miles) from Guam. It was not the first time Guam has been put on notice and similar threats made since 2013 led to the U.S. military permanently deploying a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor system on the tiny island.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists wait for a bus in the Tumon tourist district. In response to President Donald Trump's tough rhetoric, North Korea said on Thursday it was finalising plans to fire four intermediate-range missiles that would land 30-40 km (18-25 miles) from...more

Tourists wait for a bus in the Tumon tourist district. In response to President Donald Trump's tough rhetoric, North Korea said on Thursday it was finalising plans to fire four intermediate-range missiles that would land 30-40 km (18-25 miles) from Guam. It was not the first time Guam has been put on notice and similar threats made since 2013 led to the U.S. military permanently deploying a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor system on the tiny island. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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A tourist frolics in Tumon beach. Guam's international airport was abuzz on Thursday with inbound tourists pushing trolleys loaded with suitcases, some of the 10,000-15,000 visitors on the island on any given day. Japanese tourists sat outdoors in coffee shops or queued in the sun for ice cream while others perused luxury goods stores or tried on surf shorts and sunglasses.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A tourist frolics in Tumon beach. Guam's international airport was abuzz on Thursday with inbound tourists pushing trolleys loaded with suitcases, some of the 10,000-15,000 visitors on the island on any given day. Japanese tourists sat outdoors in...more

A tourist frolics in Tumon beach. Guam's international airport was abuzz on Thursday with inbound tourists pushing trolleys loaded with suitcases, some of the 10,000-15,000 visitors on the island on any given day. Japanese tourists sat outdoors in coffee shops or queued in the sun for ice cream while others perused luxury goods stores or tried on surf shorts and sunglasses. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Residents do their daily routine Zumba class inside a mall. The main beach front was busy with tourists dozing under trees or on the sun loungers of five-star hotels lined up before a calm sea where people in kayaks collided with swan-shaped pedalos and inflatable hoops.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Residents do their daily routine Zumba class inside a mall. The main beach front was busy with tourists dozing under trees or on the sun loungers of five-star hotels lined up before a calm sea where people in kayaks collided with swan-shaped pedalos...more

Residents do their daily routine Zumba class inside a mall. The main beach front was busy with tourists dozing under trees or on the sun loungers of five-star hotels lined up before a calm sea where people in kayaks collided with swan-shaped pedalos and inflatable hoops. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists pose as they rest in Tumon tourist district. Zhao Liang, a 35-year-old bank teller from Beijing, said she won't be cutting short her vacation over North Korea's latest missile threats. "It's just like setting off fireworks because most of their guided missiles just crash midway through flight," she said. "There's nothing to worry about at all and we'll just go on with our excursion and happily shop around."

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists pose as they rest in Tumon tourist district. Zhao Liang, a 35-year-old bank teller from Beijing, said she won't be cutting short her vacation over North Korea's latest missile threats. "It's just like setting off fireworks because most of...more

Tourists pose as they rest in Tumon tourist district. Zhao Liang, a 35-year-old bank teller from Beijing, said she won't be cutting short her vacation over North Korea's latest missile threats. "It's just like setting off fireworks because most of their guided missiles just crash midway through flight," she said. "There's nothing to worry about at all and we'll just go on with our excursion and happily shop around." REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists ride a bus in the Tumon tourist district. 

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists ride a bus in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists ride a bus in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Local residents are pictured at Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Local residents are pictured at Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Local residents are pictured at Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists snorkel on the waters off Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists snorkel on the waters off Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists snorkel on the waters off Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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A South Korean tourist carries his child in the Tumon tourist district.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A South Korean tourist carries his child in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A South Korean tourist carries his child in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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An amusement worker poses at the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

An amusement worker poses at the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

An amusement worker poses at the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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South Korean tourists stroll outside the Governor's Complex. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

South Korean tourists stroll outside the Governor's Complex. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

South Korean tourists stroll outside the Governor's Complex. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Guam Governor Eddie Calvo speaks during an interview with Reuters. Governor Eddie Calvo describes his island to those who don't know it as a "mini Hawaii" and puts the chances of a direct missile hit at a million-to-one because of the multi layers of Pacific defences, the last being those on Guam itself. Having experienced a Japanese invasion in World War Two and countless earthquakes and super-typhoons, there was no United States community better prepared than Guam "for any contingency", Calvo, dressed in a light blue tropical shirt, said in an interview at his office. "We are concerned about these threats but at the same time we also want to make sure people don't panic and go on with their lives. Enjoy the beaches," he said.

REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Guam Governor Eddie Calvo speaks during an interview with Reuters. Governor Eddie Calvo describes his island to those who don't know it as a "mini Hawaii" and puts the chances of a direct missile hit at a million-to-one because of the multi layers of...more

Guam Governor Eddie Calvo speaks during an interview with Reuters. Governor Eddie Calvo describes his island to those who don't know it as a "mini Hawaii" and puts the chances of a direct missile hit at a million-to-one because of the multi layers of Pacific defences, the last being those on Guam itself. Having experienced a Japanese invasion in World War Two and countless earthquakes and super-typhoons, there was no United States community better prepared than Guam "for any contingency", Calvo, dressed in a light blue tropical shirt, said in an interview at his office. "We are concerned about these threats but at the same time we also want to make sure people don't panic and go on with their lives. Enjoy the beaches," he said. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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A view of the entrance of U.S. military Andersen Air Force base. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A view of the entrance of U.S. military Andersen Air Force base. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A view of the entrance of U.S. military Andersen Air Force base. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Pupils play near the World War II remnants of a torpedo at the Asan Memorial Park. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Pupils play near the World War II remnants of a torpedo at the Asan Memorial Park. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Pupils play near the World War II remnants of a torpedo at the Asan Memorial Park. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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A pupil flies his kite on the fields of Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A pupil flies his kite on the fields of Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

A pupil flies his kite on the fields of Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Tourists parasail off the waters of Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists parasail off the waters of Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Tourists parasail off the waters of Tumon beach. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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