Edition:
International
Pictures | Fri Jan 27, 2017 | 12:40pm EST

History of a special relationship

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Reagan share a laugh during a meeting of the Allied leaders in New York on October 24, 1985. The defining image of British and U.S. relations by the end of the Cold War was of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan. The grocers' daughter and the Hollywood film star struck up a rapport on the basis of their shared commitment to small government, economic liberalism and anti-communism.  REUTERS/Chas Cancellare

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Reagan share a laugh during a meeting of the Allied leaders in New York on October 24, 1985. The defining image of British and U.S. relations by the end of the Cold War was of Prime Minister...more

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Reagan share a laugh during a meeting of the Allied leaders in New York on October 24, 1985. The defining image of British and U.S. relations by the end of the Cold War was of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan. The grocers' daughter and the Hollywood film star struck up a rapport on the basis of their shared commitment to small government, economic liberalism and anti-communism. REUTERS/Chas Cancellare
Close
1 / 20
President Reagan drives Britain Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher toward their meeting in Camp David on November 15, 1986, after her arrival by helicopter from Washington. Even this relationship was subjected to strains, however. Thatcher was angered by the U.S. invasion of Grenada, a Commonwealth nation in 1983. In 2014 a recording of a phone call by Reagan, apologising to Thatcher, was released. REUTERS/Anthony Hayward

President Reagan drives Britain Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher toward their meeting in Camp David on November 15, 1986, after her arrival by helicopter from Washington. Even this relationship was subjected to strains, however. Thatcher was angered...more

President Reagan drives Britain Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher toward their meeting in Camp David on November 15, 1986, after her arrival by helicopter from Washington. Even this relationship was subjected to strains, however. Thatcher was angered by the U.S. invasion of Grenada, a Commonwealth nation in 1983. In 2014 a recording of a phone call by Reagan, apologising to Thatcher, was released. REUTERS/Anthony Hayward
Close
2 / 20
President Ronald Reagan and Britain's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher dance in the foyer of the White House during a State Dinner in Thatcher's honor November 16, 1988 in Washington.  REUTERS/Larry Rubenstein

President Ronald Reagan and Britain's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher dance in the foyer of the White House during a State Dinner in Thatcher's honor November 16, 1988 in Washington. REUTERS/Larry Rubenstein

President Ronald Reagan and Britain's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher dance in the foyer of the White House during a State Dinner in Thatcher's honor November 16, 1988 in Washington. REUTERS/Larry Rubenstein
Close
3 / 20
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and U.S. Vice President George Bush pause for the press on the porch of the Vice President's residence before a breakfast meeting November 15, 1986.  REUTERS/C. Combes

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and U.S. Vice President George Bush pause for the press on the porch of the Vice President's residence before a breakfast meeting November 15, 1986. REUTERS/C. Combes

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and U.S. Vice President George Bush pause for the press on the porch of the Vice President's residence before a breakfast meeting November 15, 1986. REUTERS/C. Combes
Close
4 / 20
President Bill Clinton and Hillary sing the U.S. national anthem, standing alongside British Prime Minister John Major and wife Norma during a D-Day commemoration ceremony at the American Cemetery and Memorial in Cambridge June 4, 1994.  REUTERS/Stringer

President Bill Clinton and Hillary sing the U.S. national anthem, standing alongside British Prime Minister John Major and wife Norma during a D-Day commemoration ceremony at the American Cemetery and Memorial in Cambridge June 4, 1994. ...more

President Bill Clinton and Hillary sing the U.S. national anthem, standing alongside British Prime Minister John Major and wife Norma during a D-Day commemoration ceremony at the American Cemetery and Memorial in Cambridge June 4, 1994. REUTERS/Stringer
Close
5 / 20
President Bill Clinton toasts with British Prime Minister John Major during a formal dinner at the Prime Minister's official residence at No. 10 Downing Street, November 29, 1995.  REUTERS/Stringer

President Bill Clinton toasts with British Prime Minister John Major during a formal dinner at the Prime Minister's official residence at No. 10 Downing Street, November 29, 1995. REUTERS/Stringer

President Bill Clinton toasts with British Prime Minister John Major during a formal dinner at the Prime Minister's official residence at No. 10 Downing Street, November 29, 1995. REUTERS/Stringer
Close
6 / 20
President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair speak together during the NATO signing ceremony at the Elysee Palace May 27, 1997.  REUTERS/Charles Platiau

President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair speak together during the NATO signing ceremony at the Elysee Palace May 27, 1997. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair speak together during the NATO signing ceremony at the Elysee Palace May 27, 1997. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
Close
7 / 20
President George W. Bush (R) puts his hand on the back of Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair (L) as they enter 10 Downing Street in London, November 20, 2003. The special relationship was reinforced again with the co-operation of Prime Minister Tony Blair and President George W. Bush over the Iraq War.  REUTERS/Russell Boyce

President George W. Bush (R) puts his hand on the back of Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair (L) as they enter 10 Downing Street in London, November 20, 2003. The special relationship was reinforced again with the co-operation of Prime Minister Tony...more

President George W. Bush (R) puts his hand on the back of Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair (L) as they enter 10 Downing Street in London, November 20, 2003. The special relationship was reinforced again with the co-operation of Prime Minister Tony Blair and President George W. Bush over the Iraq War. REUTERS/Russell Boyce
Close
8 / 20
President George W. Bush shakes hands with British Prime Minister Tony Blair moments after receiving a note from U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld given to him by National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is sovereign" during the opening working session of the NATO Summit at the Istanbul Convention and Exhibition Center in Istanbul, Turkey, June 28, 2004. The president returned the note to Dr. Rice after writing, "Let freedom reign." Following the 9/11 attacks on the United States, Blair was keen to offer support to the United States. However, while the initial military action to depose Saddam Hussein as Iraq's leader in 2003 achieved its aims, the war became drawn out.  The lack of weapons of mass destruction, which had provided a justification for the action, drew opposition on both sides of the Atlantic, with some describing Blair as a puppet of Bush.   REUTERS/Larry Downing

President George W. Bush shakes hands with British Prime Minister Tony Blair moments after receiving a note from U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld given to him by National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is...more

President George W. Bush shakes hands with British Prime Minister Tony Blair moments after receiving a note from U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld given to him by National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is sovereign" during the opening working session of the NATO Summit at the Istanbul Convention and Exhibition Center in Istanbul, Turkey, June 28, 2004. The president returned the note to Dr. Rice after writing, "Let freedom reign." Following the 9/11 attacks on the United States, Blair was keen to offer support to the United States. However, while the initial military action to depose Saddam Hussein as Iraq's leader in 2003 achieved its aims, the war became drawn out. The lack of weapons of mass destruction, which had provided a justification for the action, drew opposition on both sides of the Atlantic, with some describing Blair as a puppet of Bush. REUTERS/Larry Downing
Close
9 / 20
President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair leave the East Room of the White House after speaking to reporters about Iraq in Washington May 25, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair leave the East Room of the White House after speaking to reporters about Iraq in Washington May 25, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair leave the East Room of the White House after speaking to reporters about Iraq in Washington May 25, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Close
10 / 20
President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown walk through the Colonnade at the White House in Washington, March 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jim Young

President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown walk through the Colonnade at the White House in Washington, March 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jim Young

President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown walk through the Colonnade at the White House in Washington, March 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jim Young
Close
11 / 20
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown smiles during a joint news conference with President Barack Obama at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Jason Reed

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown smiles during a joint news conference with President Barack Obama at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Jason Reed

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown smiles during a joint news conference with President Barack Obama at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Jason Reed
Close
12 / 20
Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown and President Barack Obama leave 10 Downing Street in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown and President Barack Obama leave 10 Downing Street in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown and President Barack Obama leave 10 Downing Street in London April 1, 2009. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Close
13 / 20
President Barack Obama plays table tennis against students with British Prime Minister David Cameron at the Globe Academy in London May 24, 2011. Obama was popular in Britain and Prime Minister David Cameron was keen to portray their closeness, in contrast to the more awkward manner of his predecessor Gordon Brown. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama plays table tennis against students with British Prime Minister David Cameron at the Globe Academy in London May 24, 2011. Obama was popular in Britain and Prime Minister David Cameron was keen to portray their closeness, in...more

President Barack Obama plays table tennis against students with British Prime Minister David Cameron at the Globe Academy in London May 24, 2011. Obama was popular in Britain and Prime Minister David Cameron was keen to portray their closeness, in contrast to the more awkward manner of his predecessor Gordon Brown. REUTERS/Larry Downing
Close
14 / 20
President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron each eat hot dogs at a first round "First Four" game of the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament between Mississippi Valley State and Western Kentucky at the University of Dayton Arena in Ohio, March 13, 2012.     Cameron high-fived Obama as they played table tennis during a visit to London in 2011, while Cameron ate hotdogs with the president as they took in a university basketball game in Ohio.   REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron each eat hot dogs at a first round "First Four" game of the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament between Mississippi Valley State and Western Kentucky at the University of Dayton...more

President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron each eat hot dogs at a first round "First Four" game of the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament between Mississippi Valley State and Western Kentucky at the University of Dayton Arena in Ohio, March 13, 2012. Cameron high-fived Obama as they played table tennis during a visit to London in 2011, while Cameron ate hotdogs with the president as they took in a university basketball game in Ohio. REUTERS/Larry Downing
Close
15 / 20
President Barack Obama welcomes Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron aboard Air Force One as they depart to go to Ohio to watch one of the opening games of the NCAA Men's Basketball tournament, from Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, March 13, 2012. However, Obama's comment in April 2016 that Britain would be "at the back of the queue" in trade talks should it vote to leave the EU also raised questions among Britons about the value of the relationship.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama welcomes Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron aboard Air Force One as they depart to go to Ohio to watch one of the opening games of the NCAA Men's Basketball tournament, from Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, March 13, 2012....more

President Barack Obama welcomes Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron aboard Air Force One as they depart to go to Ohio to watch one of the opening games of the NCAA Men's Basketball tournament, from Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, March 13, 2012. However, Obama's comment in April 2016 that Britain would be "at the back of the queue" in trade talks should it vote to leave the EU also raised questions among Britons about the value of the relationship. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Close
16 / 20
British Prime Minister Theresa May looks over toward President Barack Obama during the luncheon at the United Nations General Assembly in New York September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

British Prime Minister Theresa May looks over toward President Barack Obama during the luncheon at the United Nations General Assembly in New York September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

British Prime Minister Theresa May looks over toward President Barack Obama during the luncheon at the United Nations General Assembly in New York September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Close
17 / 20
President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrive to speak to reporters after their bilateral meeting alongside the G20 Summit, in Ming Yuan Hall at Westlake Statehouse in Hangzhou, China September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrive to speak to reporters after their bilateral meeting alongside the G20 Summit, in Ming Yuan Hall at Westlake Statehouse in Hangzhou, China September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrive to speak to reporters after their bilateral meeting alongside the G20 Summit, in Ming Yuan Hall at Westlake Statehouse in Hangzhou, China September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Close
18 / 20
President Donald Trump meets with British Prime Theresa Minister May in the White House Oval Office in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President Donald Trump meets with British Prime Theresa Minister May in the White House Oval Office in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President Donald Trump meets with British Prime Theresa Minister May in the White House Oval Office in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Close
19 / 20
President Donald Trump greets British Prime Minister Theresa May as she arrives at the White House in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

President Donald Trump greets British Prime Minister Theresa May as she arrives at the White House in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

President Donald Trump greets British Prime Minister Theresa May as she arrives at the White House in Washington, January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Close
20 / 20

Next Slideshows

Wildfires raging in Chile

The worst wildfires in Chile's modern history are ravaging wide swaths of the country's central-south regions.

Jan 27 2017

Migrant rescue on the high seas

Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescues 104 sub-Saharan migrants aboard an overcrowded raft, in the central Mediterranean Sea.

Jan 27 2017

Remembering the Holocaust

Some of the last survivors of Auschwitz pay homage to the victims of the Holocaust 72 years after the Nazi death camp was liberated in the final throes of World...

Jan 27 2017

Being President Trump

Inside Donald Trump's first week in the White House.

Jan 27 2017

MORE IN PICTURES

In pictures: At least 125 dead in Indonesian soccer stampede

In pictures: At least 125 dead in Indonesian soccer stampede

A stampede at a soccer stadium in Indonesia has killed 125 people and injured more than 320 after police police used tear gas to quell a pitch invasion, authorities said on Sunday, in one of the world's worst stadium disasters.

Hurricane Ian's long trail of devastation from above

Hurricane Ian's long trail of devastation from above

Aerial images show damage to roads, buildings and other infrastructure in Florida in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian.

Scenes from Florida in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian

Scenes from Florida in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian

One of the strongest storms ever to hit the U.S. mainland, Hurricane Ian flooded Gulf Coast communities and knocked out power to millions.

Pictures of the month: September

Pictures of the month: September

Our top photos from around the world in September 2022.

In pictures: Hurricane Ian carves path of destruction across Florida

In pictures: Hurricane Ian carves path of destruction across Florida

One of the strongest storms ever to hit the U.S. mainland, Hurricane Ian flooded Gulf Coast communities and knocked out power to millions.

Our oddest, most unusual photos of the month

Our oddest, most unusual photos of the month

Odd and unusual images from around the world this past month.

New UK coins featuring image of King Charles unveiled

New UK coins featuring image of King Charles unveiled

The first British coins to feature the image of King Charles have been revealed by the Royal Mint.

Dozens killed in Russian missile strike on civilian convoy in Ukraine

Dozens killed in Russian missile strike on civilian convoy in Ukraine

Warning: This gallery contains graphic content. Dozens of civilians were killed or wounded in what Kyiv said was a cynical Russian missile strike on a convoy of civilian cars.

Kenya faces hunger crisis as drought wipes out livestock

Kenya faces hunger crisis as drought wipes out livestock

For the last four years the annual rains have failed across Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia and forced 1.5 million people to flee their homes in search of food and water elsewhere.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast