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Pictures | Tue Jun 14, 2022 | 10:04am EDT

In hottest city on Earth, mothers bear brunt of climate change

Razia, 25, and her six-month-old daughter Tamanna, sit in front of a fan to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Razia, 25, and her six-month-old daughter Tamanna, sit in front of a fan to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising...more

Razia, 25, and her six-month-old daughter Tamanna, sit in front of a fan to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Heavily Pregnant, Sonari, collects muskmelons during a heatwave, at a farm on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. "When the heat is coming and we're pregnant, we feel stressed," said Sonari.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Heavily Pregnant, Sonari, collects muskmelons during a heatwave, at a farm on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. "When the heat is coming and we're pregnant, we feel stressed," said Sonari. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Heavily Pregnant, Sonari, collects muskmelons during a heatwave, at a farm on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. "When the heat is coming and we're pregnant, we feel stressed," said Sonari. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A woman walks to fetch water from a nearby hand-pump with a water cooler on her head, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A woman walks to fetch water from a nearby hand-pump with a water cooler on her head, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to...more

A woman walks to fetch water from a nearby hand-pump with a water cooler on her head, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Women and children wash themselves after work at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, at a hand pump on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Women and children wash themselves after work at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, at a hand pump on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to...more

Women and children wash themselves after work at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, at a hand pump on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Biban, a pregnant farmer, clears unwanted grass at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Biban, a pregnant farmer, clears unwanted grass at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising...more

Biban, a pregnant farmer, clears unwanted grass at a muskmelon farm, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A woman drinks a plum and tamarind drink to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A woman drinks a plum and tamarind drink to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the...more

A woman drinks a plum and tamarind drink to cool off during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Rabia fans her son, Manish Kumar, 10, as he lies in bed after having a bladder stone removed, during a heatwave, at Civil Hospital, Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Rabia fans her son, Manish Kumar, 10, as he lies in bed after having a bladder stone removed, during a heatwave, at Civil Hospital, Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of...more

Rabia fans her son, Manish Kumar, 10, as he lies in bed after having a bladder stone removed, during a heatwave, at Civil Hospital, Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Mohammad Iqbal, 42, a pump operator, speaks on his mobile phone while checking the water levels of one of the chambers at a reverse osmosis plant in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Mohammad Iqbal, 42, a pump operator, speaks on his mobile phone while checking the water levels of one of the chambers at a reverse osmosis plant in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their...more

Mohammad Iqbal, 42, a pump operator, speaks on his mobile phone while checking the water levels of one of the chambers at a reverse osmosis plant in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Liza Khan, 22, project manager at the Community Development Foundation (CDF), walks to her office in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 18, 2022. "It feels like no one sees them, no one cares about them," Khan said more broadly about the plight facing many women in Jacobabad and the wider Sindh region. "Nowadays I'm working 24/7," she said. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro.

Liza Khan, 22, project manager at the Community Development Foundation (CDF), walks to her office in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 18, 2022. "It feels like no one sees them, no one cares about them," Khan said more broadly about the plight facing many...more

Liza Khan, 22, project manager at the Community Development Foundation (CDF), walks to her office in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 18, 2022. "It feels like no one sees them, no one cares about them," Khan said more broadly about the plight facing many women in Jacobabad and the wider Sindh region. "Nowadays I'm working 24/7," she said. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro.
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Parya, 42, a labourer, works in the sun during a heatwave at a brick kiln factory, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Parya, 42, a labourer, works in the sun during a heatwave at a brick kiln factory, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell,...more

Parya, 42, a labourer, works in the sun during a heatwave at a brick kiln factory, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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One boy bathes while another draws water from a hand pump, near a buffalo sitting in the mud to cool off, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

One boy bathes while another draws water from a hand pump, near a buffalo sitting in the mud to cool off, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the...more

One boy bathes while another draws water from a hand pump, near a buffalo sitting in the mud to cool off, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Chaneser, 45, piles up bricks on a tractor trolly during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Chaneser, 45, piles up bricks on a tractor trolly during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Chaneser, 45, piles up bricks on a tractor trolly during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Farmer Waderi, 17, fans her one-month-old son Amar Kumar during a heatwave, at home, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Farmer Waderi, 17, fans her one-month-old son Amar Kumar during a heatwave, at home, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures...more

Farmer Waderi, 17, fans her one-month-old son Amar Kumar during a heatwave, at home, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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One-month-old Vamar Kumar, sleeps at home under a mosquito net, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

One-month-old Vamar Kumar, sleeps at home under a mosquito net, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in...more

One-month-old Vamar Kumar, sleeps at home under a mosquito net, during a heatwave, on the outskirts of Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Men sleep on charpoy rope beds, early in the morning during a heatwave, on a roof in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Men sleep on charpoy rope beds, early in the morning during a heatwave, on a roof in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell,...more

Men sleep on charpoy rope beds, early in the morning during a heatwave, on a roof in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A man poses for a photo as he eats gola ganda, a shaved ice dessert, to cool off outside a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A man poses for a photo as he eats gola ganda, a shaved ice dessert, to cool off outside a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If...more

A man poses for a photo as he eats gola ganda, a shaved ice dessert, to cool off outside a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Senior observer, Iftikhar Ahmed, points on the metrological observation pocket register to 51 degrees Celsius, recorded on May 14, 2022, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Senior observer, Iftikhar Ahmed, points on the metrological observation pocket register to 51 degrees Celsius, recorded on May 14, 2022, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as...more

Senior observer, Iftikhar Ahmed, points on the metrological observation pocket register to 51 degrees Celsius, recorded on May 14, 2022, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 17, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Children sit in a classroom during a power outage, at the Adolescent and Adult Learning and Training Program (AALTP), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Children sit in a classroom during a power outage, at the Adolescent and Adult Learning and Training Program (AALTP), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's...more

Children sit in a classroom during a power outage, at the Adolescent and Adult Learning and Training Program (AALTP), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 16, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Cobbler Fazal Mohammad, 40, repairs a sandal as he sits in front of an air-cooler during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Cobbler Fazal Mohammad, 40, repairs a sandal as he sits in front of an air-cooler during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities....more

Cobbler Fazal Mohammad, 40, repairs a sandal as he sits in front of an air-cooler during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A man pulls a donkey cart as a boy sits on jerrycans, filled with water from a private pump, to sell them door-to-door, during a heatwave at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 13, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A man pulls a donkey cart as a boy sits on jerrycans, filled with water from a private pump, to sell them door-to-door, during a heatwave at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 13, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware...more

A man pulls a donkey cart as a boy sits on jerrycans, filled with water from a private pump, to sell them door-to-door, during a heatwave at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 13, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Rubina, 35, prepares food for her family during a heatwave, at home in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Rubina said she usually felt dizzy in the heat and tried to soak herself in water each time she cooked to prevent herself from fainting. There was not always enough water to do so, though. "Most of the time, it ends before it's time to buy more and we must wait," she added, as she supervised her children and grandchildren sharing a cup of water. "On the hot days with no water, no electricity we wake up and the only thing we do is pray to God."  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Rubina, 35, prepares food for her family during a heatwave, at home in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Rubina said she usually felt dizzy in the heat and tried to soak herself in water each time she cooked to prevent herself from fainting. There...more

Rubina, 35, prepares food for her family during a heatwave, at home in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Rubina said she usually felt dizzy in the heat and tried to soak herself in water each time she cooked to prevent herself from fainting. There was not always enough water to do so, though. "Most of the time, it ends before it's time to buy more and we must wait," she added, as she supervised her children and grandchildren sharing a cup of water. "On the hot days with no water, no electricity we wake up and the only thing we do is pray to God." REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A man holds his heat-stressed chicken while another man administers an injection, during a heatwave, at a pet shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A man holds his heat-stressed chicken while another man administers an injection, during a heatwave, at a pet shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's...more

A man holds his heat-stressed chicken while another man administers an injection, during a heatwave, at a pet shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Rehmat, stitches a Sindhi ralli quilt, while sitting in front of a fan to cool off, during a heatwave in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Rehmat, stitches a Sindhi ralli quilt, while sitting in front of a fan to cool off, during a heatwave in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures...more

Rehmat, stitches a Sindhi ralli quilt, while sitting in front of a fan to cool off, during a heatwave in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Last month Jacobabad became the hottest city on Earth. Women are especially vulnerable to rising temperatures in poor countries on the frontlines of climate change because many have little choice but to work through their pregnancies and soon after giving birth, according to interviews with more than a dozen female residents in the Jacobabad area as well as half a dozen development and human rights experts. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Gulam Mohammad, 37, a vegetable seller, sprays water from his mouth to cool off his chicken, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Gulam Mohammad, 37, a vegetable seller, sprays water from his mouth to cool off his chicken, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's...more

Gulam Mohammad, 37, a vegetable seller, sprays water from his mouth to cool off his chicken, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A flag with a religious sign is seen on a wall, along with a television screen and a satellite receiver, during a power outage in a heatwave, in a low-income neighbourhood in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A flag with a religious sign is seen on a wall, along with a television screen and a satellite receiver, during a power outage in a heatwave, in a low-income neighbourhood in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A flag with a religious sign is seen on a wall, along with a television screen and a satellite receiver, during a power outage in a heatwave, in a low-income neighbourhood in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Kaloo, 60, repairs a fan with a spoon while at work in a cafe, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Kaloo, 60, repairs a fan with a spoon while at work in a cafe, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell,...more

Kaloo, 60, repairs a fan with a spoon while at work in a cafe, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A father and his son fill water canisters from a private pump to sell door-to-door, during a heatwave, at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A father and his son fill water canisters from a private pump to sell door-to-door, during a heatwave, at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the...more

A father and his son fill water canisters from a private pump to sell door-to-door, during a heatwave, at residential area in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 15, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A man sits in front of a fan, as he prepares dough for oven-baked flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A man sits in front of a fan, as he prepares dough for oven-baked flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest...more

A man sits in front of a fan, as he prepares dough for oven-baked flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Men sit and watch television during a heatwave, at a tailor shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Men sit and watch television during a heatwave, at a tailor shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a...more

Men sit and watch television during a heatwave, at a tailor shop in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Chaneser, 45, is reflected in a mirror of a tractor trolly, as he takes a break from work, during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Chaneser, 45, is reflected in a mirror of a tractor trolly, as he takes a break from work, during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Chaneser, 45, is reflected in a mirror of a tractor trolly, as he takes a break from work, during a heatwave, at a brick kiln factory in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Local residents eat their lunch of curry and flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Local residents eat their lunch of curry and flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to...more

Local residents eat their lunch of curry and flatbread, during a heatwave, at a cafe in Jacobabad, Pakistan May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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People in a rickshaw carry a solar panel, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

People in a rickshaw carry a solar panel, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a...more

People in a rickshaw carry a solar panel, during a heatwave, in Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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A grandmother visits her grandson while he sleeps, during a heatwave, at the Jacobabad Institute of Medical Sciences (JIMS), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022.  Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A grandmother visits her grandson while he sleeps, during a heatwave, at the Jacobabad Institute of Medical Sciences (JIMS), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the...more

A grandmother visits her grandson while he sleeps, during a heatwave, at the Jacobabad Institute of Medical Sciences (JIMS), Jacobabad, Pakistan, May 14, 2022. Jacobabad's roughly 200,000 residents are well aware of their reputation as one of the world's hottest cities. "If we go to hell, we'll take a blanket," is a common joke told in the area. Few places are more punishing. Last month, temperatures hit 51 Celsius (124 Fahrenheit) on May 14, which local meteorological officials was highly unusual for that time of year. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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