Edition:
International
Pictures | Tue Oct 26, 2021 | 2:02pm EDT

Inside a Kabul children's hospital as Afghanistan's health system crumbles

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul, October 24. Afghanistan's health system is crumbling amid the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with hunger.  

REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul, October 24. Afghanistan's health system is crumbling amid the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with...more

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul, October 24. Afghanistan's health system is crumbling amid the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with hunger. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
1 / 17
As crowds of mothers and sick children fill waiting rooms in the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, medical staff are squeezing three babies into a single incubator and doubling them up in cot-like infant warmer beds. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

As crowds of mothers and sick children fill waiting rooms in the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, medical staff are squeezing three babies into a single incubator and doubling them up in cot-like infant warmer beds. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

As crowds of mothers and sick children fill waiting rooms in the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, medical staff are squeezing three babies into a single incubator and doubling them up in cot-like infant warmer beds. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
2 / 17
Nurses who once took care of three or four babies each are now having to look after 20 or more to make up for the absence of staff who fled the country when the Taliban seized power in August.     

 REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nurses who once took care of three or four babies each are now having to look after 20 or more to make up for the absence of staff who fled the country when the Taliban seized power in August. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nurses who once took care of three or four babies each are now having to look after 20 or more to make up for the absence of staff who fled the country when the Taliban seized power in August. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
3 / 17
Although the number of blast victims and war wounded have fallen since the fighting ended, Afghanistan's hospitals are grappling with the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with hunger.    REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Although the number of blast victims and war wounded have fallen since the fighting ended, Afghanistan's hospitals are grappling with the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with hunger. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Although the number of blast victims and war wounded have fallen since the fighting ended, Afghanistan's hospitals are grappling with the fallout of a rapidly spreading economic crisis that has threatened millions with hunger. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
4 / 17
U.N. agencies say as much as 95% of the population does not regularly have enough to eat and last month, the head of the World Health Organisation warned the health system was on the brink of collapse as international aid has dried up.   REUTERS/Jorge Silva

U.N. agencies say as much as 95% of the population does not regularly have enough to eat and last month, the head of the World Health Organisation warned the health system was on the brink of collapse as international aid has dried up. ...more

U.N. agencies say as much as 95% of the population does not regularly have enough to eat and last month, the head of the World Health Organisation warned the health system was on the brink of collapse as international aid has dried up. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
5 / 17
For the medical team, it is the acute staff shortage that is causing the heaviest strain. They have not been paid in months and often struggle even to pay their car fare to work. "We only ask from the government firstly that, they should increase our staff," says Marwa, the nursing supervisor in the nursery ward. "Because of the changes, most of our colleagues left the country."   REUTERS/Jorge Silva

For the medical team, it is the acute staff shortage that is causing the heaviest strain. They have not been paid in months and often struggle even to pay their car fare to work. "We only ask from the government firstly that, they should increase our...more

For the medical team, it is the acute staff shortage that is causing the heaviest strain. They have not been paid in months and often struggle even to pay their car fare to work. "We only ask from the government firstly that, they should increase our staff," says Marwa, the nursing supervisor in the nursery ward. "Because of the changes, most of our colleagues left the country." REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
6 / 17
Nurses who would normally be taking care of three or four babies for each nurse are now handling 23. "It is a lot of load on us," she said.   
 REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nurses who would normally be taking care of three or four babies for each nurse are now handling 23. "It is a lot of load on us," she said. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nurses who would normally be taking care of three or four babies for each nurse are now handling 23. "It is a lot of load on us," she said. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
7 / 17
The hospital, built during the Soviet era in 1985 and financed by Indian aid money, has 360 beds but is operating well over capacity because of the lack of functioning clinics in the provinces around Kabul. 
  REUTERS/Jorge Silva

The hospital, built during the Soviet era in 1985 and financed by Indian aid money, has 360 beds but is operating well over capacity because of the lack of functioning clinics in the provinces around Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

The hospital, built during the Soviet era in 1985 and financed by Indian aid money, has 360 beds but is operating well over capacity because of the lack of functioning clinics in the provinces around Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
8 / 17
Farooq lies in a shared incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul.  
  REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Farooq lies in a shared incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Farooq lies in a shared incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
9 / 17
A family is seen at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A family is seen at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A family is seen at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
10 / 17
A 40-day-old baby lies in bed at the premature infants ward. The doctor said that the baby did not cry at the moment of birth and the brain has not receivied proper circulation in the last 40 days. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A 40-day-old baby lies in bed at the premature infants ward. The doctor said that the baby did not cry at the moment of birth and the brain has not receivied proper circulation in the last 40 days. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A 40-day-old baby lies in bed at the premature infants ward. The doctor said that the baby did not cry at the moment of birth and the brain has not receivied proper circulation in the last 40 days. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
11 / 17
A family at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A family at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A family at the intensive care unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
12 / 17
Mohammad Latif Baher, assistant director of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, said officials from the U.N. children's agency UNICEF have given some help but more is needed quickly to fill the shortage of medicines and supplies to treat malnourished children. "They (international organisations) have promised more aid. And we hope that they will keep their promises," Baher says.   REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Mohammad Latif Baher, assistant director of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, said officials from the U.N. children's agency UNICEF have given some help but more is needed quickly to fill the shortage of medicines and supplies to treat...more

Mohammad Latif Baher, assistant director of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, said officials from the U.N. children's agency UNICEF have given some help but more is needed quickly to fill the shortage of medicines and supplies to treat malnourished children. "They (international organisations) have promised more aid. And we hope that they will keep their promises," Baher says. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
13 / 17
Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul.  
 REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
14 / 17
Women stand at the intensive care ward of the children hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Women stand at the intensive care ward of the children hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Women stand at the intensive care ward of the children hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
15 / 17
Babies sleep in a shared bed at the maternity unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Babies sleep in a shared bed at the maternity unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Babies sleep in a shared bed at the maternity unit at the Indira Gandhi hospital in Kabul. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
16 / 17
Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Three babies share an incubator at the premature infants ward at the Indira Gandhi hospital. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
17 / 17

Next Slideshows

Alien world under Austria's doomed glaciers tells tale of their collapse

Scientists are venturing inside otherworldly ice caves growing beneath Austria's doomed glaciers to study why they are melting even faster than expected, and...

Oct 26 2021

Giant 'Squid Game' doll appears in Seoul park

An imitation of a giant doll from 'Squid Game' surfaces at a Seoul park, giving fans and curious onlookers a chance to experience a bit of what it feels like...

Oct 26 2021

Japan's Princess Mako gives up royal title to marry college sweetheart

Japan s Princess Mako, the emperor s niece, marries her college sweetheart, giving up her royal title and saying she was determined to build a happy life after...

Oct 26 2021

Hollywood film community mourns death of Halyna Hutchins

Police are investigating the fatal shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins by actor Alec Baldwin in an accident on the set of "Rust".

Oct 26 2021

MORE IN PICTURES

The political life of Angela Merkel

The political life of Angela Merkel

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has steered Europe's largest economy through the global financial crisis, the refugee crisis and the coronavirus pandemic in her 16 years in office.

Inside Indonesia's volcano disaster zone

Inside Indonesia's volcano disaster zone

Images from the aftermath of the deadly eruption of Mt. Semeru on Java.

Pictures of the year: Space

Pictures of the year: Space

Our top space photos of the year.

People's Choice Awards red carpet

People's Choice Awards red carpet

Stars attend the 2021 People's Choice Awards in Santa Monica.

Christmas markets around the world

Christmas markets around the world

People enjoy outdoor Christmas markets as the spread of COVID-19 continues around the globe.

Sketches from the Ghislaine Maxwell trial

Sketches from the Ghislaine Maxwell trial

Courtroom sketches from the trial of Ghislaine Maxwell in New York City.

A 'Celebration of Black Cinema & Television' red carpet

A 'Celebration of Black Cinema & Television' red carpet

Stars attend the The Critics Choice Association presentation of the annual Celebration of Black Cinema & Television in Los Angeles.

Our top photos of 2021

Our top photos of 2021

Our top news photography from around the world this year.

Pictures of the year: Natural Disasters

Pictures of the year: Natural Disasters

Our top photos of natural disasters from 2021.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast